Bauhaus

Bauhaus

[bou-hous]
noun
1.
a school of design established in Weimar in 1919 by Walter Gropius, moved to Dessau in 1926, and closed in 1933 as a result of Nazi hostility.
adjective
2.
of or pertaining to the concepts, ideas, or styles developed at the Bauhaus, characterized chiefly by an emphasis on functional design in architecture and the applied arts.

Origin:
1920–25; < German, equivalent to Bau- build, building + Haus house

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World English Dictionary
Bauhaus (ˈbaʊˌhaʊs)
 
n
a.  a German school of architecture and applied arts founded in 1919 by Walter Gropius on experimental principles of functionalism and truth to materials. After being closed by the Nazis in 1933, its ideas were widely disseminated by its students and staff, including Kandinsky, Klee, Feininger, Moholy-Nagy, and Mies van der Rohe
 b.  (as modifier): Bauhaus wallpaper
 
[C20: German, literally: building house]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Bauhaus
1923, from Ger., lit. "architecture-house;" school of design founded in Weimar, Germany, 1919 by Walter Gropius (1883-1969), later extended to the principles it embodied. First element is bau "building, construction, structure," from O.H.G. buan "to dwell" (see bound (adj.2)).
For second element, see house.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
Bauhaus [(bou-hous)]

A German school of applied arts of the early twentieth century. Its aim was to bring people working in architecture, modern technology, and the decorative arts together to learn from one another. The school developed a style that was spare, functional, and geometric. Bauhaus designs for buildings, chairs, teapots, and many other objects are highly prized today, but when the school was active, it was generally unpopular. The Bauhaus was closed by the Nazis, but its members, including Walter Gropius, spread its teachings throughout the world.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
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