beguile

[bih-gahyl]
verb (used with object), beguiled, beguiling.
1.
to influence by trickery, flattery, etc.; mislead; delude.
2.
to take away from by cheating or deceiving (usually followed by of ): to be beguiled of money.
3.
to charm or divert: a multitude of attractions to beguile the tourist.
4.
to pass (time) pleasantly: beguiling the long afternoon with a good book.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English bigilen. See be-, guile

beguilement, noun
beguiler, noun
unbeguiled, adjective
unbeguiling, adjective


1. deceive, cheat. 3. amuse, entertain.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
beguile (bɪˈɡaɪl)
 
vb (often foll by of or out of) , -guiles, -guiling, -guiled
1.  to charm; fascinate
2.  to delude; influence by slyness
3.  to deprive (someone) of something by trickery; cheat (someone) of
4.  to pass pleasantly; while away
 
be'guilement
 
n
 
be'guiler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

beguile
early 13c., from be- + guile (v.). Pp. adj. beguiling is recorded from c.1400.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Almost year-round gypsters beguile homeowners with promises of good deals and
  easy financing for fix-up jobs.
He's more willing to explain his artistic motives, particularly the overly
  scrutinized lyrics that beguile scholars.
She'd used her daughter's identity to beguile the two men.
If you have an eye for beauty, the Riviera's quiet elegance will instantly
  beguile you.
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