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bill1

[bil] /bɪl/
noun
1.
a statement of money owed for goods or services supplied:
He paid the hotel bill when he checked out.
2.
a piece of paper money worth a specified amount:
a ten-dollar bill.
3.
Government. a form or draft of a proposed statute presented to a legislature, but not yet enacted or passed and made law.
5.
a written or printed public notice or advertisement.
6.
any written paper containing a statement of particulars:
a bill of expenditures.
7.
Law. a written statement, usually of complaint, presented to a court.
8.
Slang. one hundred dollars:
The job pays five bills a week.
9.
10.
entertainment scheduled for presentation; program:
a good bill at the movies.
11.
Obsolete.
  1. a promissory note.
  2. a written and sealed document.
  3. a written, formal petition.
verb (used with object)
12.
to charge for by bill; send a bill to:
The store will bill me.
13.
to enter (charges) in a bill; make a bill or list of:
to bill goods.
14.
to advertise by bill or public notice:
A new actor was billed for this week.
15.
to schedule on a program:
The management billed the play for two weeks.
Idioms
16.
fill the bill, to fulfill the purpose or need well:
As a sprightly situation comedy this show fills the bill.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English bille < Anglo-French < Anglo-Latin billa for Late Latin bulla bull2
Related forms
biller, noun
Synonyms
1. reckoning, invoice, statement. 5. bulletin, handbill, poster, placard, announcement, circular, throwaway, flyer, broadside.

bill2

[bil] /bɪl/
noun
1.
the parts of a bird's jaws that are covered with a horny or leathery sheath; beak.
2.
the visor of a cap or other head covering.
3.
a beaklike promontory or headland.
verb (used without object)
4.
to join bills or beaks, as doves.
Idioms
5.
bill and coo, to kiss or fondle and whisper endearments, as lovers:
My sister and her boyfriend were billing and cooing on the front porch.
Origin
before 1000; Middle English bile, bille, Old English bile beak, trunk; akin to bill3

bill3

[bil] /bɪl/
noun
1.
a medieval shafted weapon having at its head a hooklike cutting blade with a beak at the back.
2.
Also called billman. a person armed with a bill.
3.
Also called billhook. a sharp, hooked instrument used for pruning, cutting, etc.
4.
Also called pea. Nautical. the extremity of a fluke of an anchor.
Origin
before 1000; Middle English bil, Old English bill sword; cognate with Old High German bil pickax

bill4

[bil] /bɪl/
noun, British Dialect
1.
the cry of the bittern.
Origin
1780-90; akin to bell2, bellow

Bill

[bil] /bɪl/
noun
1.
a male given name, form of William.

Gates

[geyts] /geɪts/
noun
1.
Horatio, 1728–1806, American Revolutionary general, born in England.
2.
William ("Bill") born 1956, U.S. entrepreneur.

Haley

[hey-lee] /ˈheɪ li/
noun
1.
Alex, 1921–92, U.S. writer.
2.
William John Clifton ("Bill") 1925–81, U.S. musician: rockabilly pioneer.

Hartack

[hahr-tak] /ˈhɑr tæk/
noun
1.
William John, Jr ("Bill") born 1932, U.S. jockey.

Mauldin

[mawl-duh n] /ˈmɔl dən/
noun
1.
William Henry ("Bill") 1921–2003, U.S. political cartoonist.

Monroe

[muh n-roh] /mənˈroʊ/
noun
1.
Harriet, 1861?–1936, U.S. editor and poet.
2.
James, 1758–1831, 5th president of the U.S. 1817–25.
3.
Marilyn (Norma Jean Baker or Mortenson) 1926–62, U.S. film actress.
4.
William Smith ("Bill"; "The Father of Bluegrass") 1911–96, U.S. musician, singer, and songwriter.
5.
a city in N Louisiana.
6.
a city in SE Michigan, on Lake Erie.
7.
a town in SW Connecticut.
8.
a city in S North Carolina.
9.
a town in S Wisconsin.
10.
Fort. Fort Monroe.
11.
a male given name.

Rodgers

[roj-erz] /ˈrɒdʒ ərz/
noun
1.
James Charles ("Jimmie") 1897–1933, U.S. country-and-western singer, guitarist, and composer.
2.
Richard, 1902–79, U.S. composer of popular music.
3.
William Henry ("Bill") born 1947, U.S. distance runner.

Russell

[ruhs-uh l] /ˈrʌs əl/
noun
1.
Bertrand (Arthur William), 3rd Earl, 1872–1970, English philosopher, mathematician, and author: Nobel Prize in literature 1950.
2.
Charles Edward, 1860–1941, U.S. journalist, sociologist, biographer, and political leader.
3.
Charles Taze
[teyz] /teɪz/ (Show IPA),
("Pastor Russell") 1852–1916, U.S. religious leader and publisher: founder of Jehovah's Witnesses.
4.
Elizabeth Mary, Countess (Mary Annette Beauchamp"Elizabeth") 1866–1941, Australian novelist.
5.
George William ("Æ") 1867–1935, Irish poet and painter.
6.
Henry Norris, 1877–1957, U.S. astronomer.
7.
John Russell, 1st Earl (Lord John Russell) 1792–1878, British statesman: prime minister 1846–52, 1865–66.
8.
Lillian (Helen Louise Leonard) 1861–1922, U.S. singer and actress.
9.
William Felton
[fel-tn] /ˈfɛl tn/ (Show IPA),
("Bill") born 1934, U.S. basketball player and coach.
10.
Mount, a mountain in E California, in the Sierra Nevada. 14,088 feet (4294 meters).
11.
a mountain in S central Alaska, in the Alaska Range. 11,670 feet (3557 meters).
12.
a male given name.

Terry

[ter-ee] /ˈtɛr i/
noun
1.
Clark, born 1920, U.S. jazz trumpet and flugelhorn player and singer.
2.
Ellen (Alicia or Alice) 1848?–1928, English actress.
3.
Megan (Marguerite Duffy) born 1932, U.S. playwright and feminist.
4.
William ("Bill"; "Memphis Bill") 1898–1989, U.S. baseball player.
5.
a male given name, form of Terrence or Theodore.
6.
a female given name, form of Theresa.

Clinton

[klin-tn] /ˈklɪn tn/
noun
1.
De Witt
[duh wit] /də ˈwɪt/ (Show IPA),
1769–1828, U.S. political leader and statesman: governor of New York 1817–21, 1825–28 (son of James Clinton).
2.
George, 1739–1812, governor of New York 1777–95, 1801–04: vice president of the U.S. 1805–12.
3.
Sir Henry, 1738?–95, commander in chief of the British forces in the American Revolutionary War.
4.
Hillary (Rodham) born 1947, U.S. politician: senator from New York 2001–2009; secretary of state 2009–2013 (wife of William J. Clinton).
5.
James, 1733–1812, American general in the Revolutionary War (brother of George Clinton).
6.
William J(efferson) ("Bill") born 1946, 42nd president of the U.S. 1993–2001.
7.
a city in E Iowa, on the Mississippi River.
8.
a city in central Maryland.
9.
a town in W Mississippi.
10.
a city in central Massachusetts.
11.
a town in S Connecticut.
12.
a male given name.

Cosby

[kawz-bee, koz‐] /ˈkɔz bi, ˈkɒz‐/
noun
1.
William Henry (Bill) born 1937, U.S. comedian and actor.

Dickey

[dik-ee] /ˈdɪk i/
noun
1.
James, 1923–97, U.S. poet and novelist.
2.
William ("Bill") 1907–93, U.S. baseball player.

Evans

[ev-uh nz] /ˈɛv ənz/
noun
1.
Sir Arthur John, 1851–1941, English archaeologist.
2.
Dame Edith, 1888–1976, English actress.
3.
Herbert McLean
[muh-kleyn] /məˈkleɪn/ (Show IPA),
1882–1971, U.S. embryologist and anatomist.
4.
Janet, born 1971, U.S. swimmer.
5.
Mary Ann, Eliot, George.
6.
Maurice, 1901–1989, U.S. actor and producer, born in England.
7.
Oliver, 1755–1819, U.S. inventor: constructed the first high-pressure steam engine in the U.S. 1801?.
8.
Robley Dunglison
[rob-lee duhng-gluh-suh n] /ˈrɒb li ˈdʌŋ glə sən/ (Show IPA),
("Fighting Bob") 1846–1912, U.S. admiral.
9.
Rudulph
[roo-duhlf] /ˈru dʌlf/ (Show IPA),
1878–1960, U.S. sculptor.
10.
Walker, 1903–75, U.S. photographer.
11.
William John ("Bill") 1929–80, U.S. jazz pianist.
12.
Mount, a mountain in N central Colorado, in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. 14,264 feet (4348 meters).
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for bill
  • Kane wrote, bill was disheartened by the lack of major accomplishments in his career.
  • The bill was defeated and lord derby formed a minority conservative administration.
  • The forehead is flattened, and the bill is strong and pointed.
  • The grimoire of exalted deeds is a metal fanzine edited by bill zebub.
  • Racing picture and ace band divide top spots on bill of general appeal.
  • At the match, will meets bill a man he knows from the corry.
  • bill is a weightlifter a large muscular man who coaches teenage boxers.
  • When he corners bill door, he mocks him and beats him instead of finishing the job.
  • The yellow bill colors of many hornbills are produced by preen gland secretions.
  • The only replacement available for sale belonged to bill ferny.
British Dictionary definitions for bill

bill1

/bɪl/
noun
1.
money owed for goods or services supplied an electricity bill
2.
a written or printed account or statement of money owed
3.
(mainly Brit) such an account for food and drink in a restaurant, hotel, etc Usual US and Canadian word check
4.
any printed or written list of items, events, etc, such as a theatre programme who's on the bill tonight?
5.
(informal) fit the bill, fill the bill, to serve or perform adequately
6.
a statute in draft, before it becomes law
7.
a printed notice or advertisement; poster
8.
(US & Canadian) a piece of paper money; note
9.
an obsolete name for promissory note
10.
(law) See bill of indictment
12.
13.
(archaic) any document
verb (transitive)
14.
to send or present an account for payment to (a person)
15.
to enter (items, goods, etc) on an account or statement
16.
to advertise by posters
17.
to schedule as a future programme the play is billed for next week
Word Origin
C14: from Anglo-Latin billa, alteration of Late Latin bulla document, bull³

bill2

/bɪl/
noun
1.
the mouthpart of a bird, consisting of projecting jaws covered with a horny sheath; beak. It varies in shape and size according to the type of food eaten and may also be used as a weapon
2.
any beaklike mouthpart in other animals
3.
a narrow promontory Portland Bill
4.
(nautical) the pointed tip of the fluke of an anchor
verb (intransitive)
5.
(of birds, esp doves) to touch bills together
6.
(of lovers) to kiss and whisper amorously
Word Origin
Old English bile; related to billbill³

bill3

/bɪl/
noun
1.
a pike or halberd with a narrow hooked blade
2.
short for billhook
Word Origin
Old English bill sword, related to Old Norse bīldr instrument used in blood-letting, Old High German bil pickaxe

bill4

/bɪl/
noun
1.
(ornithol) another word for boom1 (sense 4)
Word Origin
C18: from dialect beelbell² (vb)

Clinton

/ˈklɪntən/
noun
1.
Bill, full name William Jefferson Clinton. born 1946, US Democrat politician; 42nd president of the US (1993–2001)
2.
his wife, Hillary Rodham. born 1947, US Democrat politician and lawyer: first lady (1993–2001); senator (2001–09); secretary of state (2009–13)

Evans

/ˈɛvənz/
noun
1.
Sir Arthur (John). 1851–1941, British archaeologist, whose excavations of the palace of Knossos in Crete provided evidence for the existence of the Minoan civilization
2.
Dame Edith (Mary Booth). 1888–1976, British actress
3.
Sir Geraint (Llewellyn). 1922–92, Welsh operatic baritone
4.
Herbert McLean. 1882–1971, US anatomist and embryologist; discoverer of vitamin E (1922)
5.
Mary Ann. real name of (George) Eliot (sense 1)
6.
Oliver. 1755–1819, US engineer: invented the continuous production line and a high-pressure steam engine
7.
Walker. 1903–75, US photographer, noted esp for his studies of rural poverty in the Great Depression

Gates

/ɡeɪts/
noun
1.
Bill, full name William Henry Gates. born 1955, US computer-software executive and philanthropist; founder (1976) of Microsoft Corporation
2.
Henry Louis. born 1950, US scholar and critic, who pioneered African-American studies in such works as Figures in Black (1987)
3.
Horatio. ?1728–1806, American Revolutionary general: defeated the British at Saratoga (1777)

Haley

/ˈheɪlɪ/
noun
1.
Bill, full name William John Clifton Haley. 1925–81, US rock and roll singer, best known for his recording of "Rock Around the Clock" (1955)

Monroe

/mənˈrəʊ/
noun
1.
James. 1758–1831, US statesman; fifth president of the US (1817–25). He promulgated the Monroe Doctrine (1823)
2.
Marilyn, born Norma Jeane Mortenson. later Norma Jeane Baker, sometimes spelled Norma Jean, 1926–62, US film actress. Her films include Niagara (1952), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), and Some Like It Hot (1959)

Rodgers

/ˈrɒdʒəz/
noun
1.
Richard. 1902–79, US composer of musical comedies. He collaborated with the librettist Lorenz Hart on such musicals as A Connecticut Yankee (1927), On Your Toes (1936), and Pal Joey (1940). After Hart's death his librettist was Oscar Hammerstein II. Two of their musicals, Oklahoma! (1943) and South Pacific (1949), received the Pulitzer Prize

Russell

/ˈrʌsəl/
noun
1.
Bertrand (Arthur William), 3rd Earl. 1872–1970, British philosopher and mathematician. His books include Principles of Mathematics (1903), Principia Mathematica (1910–13) with A. N. Whitehead, Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy (1919), The Problems of Philosophy (1912), The Analysis of Mind (1921), and An Enquiry into Meaning and Truth (1940): Nobel prize for literature 1950
2.
George William pen name æ. 1867–1935, Irish poet and journalist
3.
Henry Norris. 1877–1957, US astronomer and astrophysicist, who originated one form of the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram
4.
John, 1st Earl. 1792–1878, British statesman; prime minister (1846–52; 1865–66). He led the campaign to carry the 1832 Reform Act
5.
Ken. 1927–2011, British film director. His films include Women in Love (1969), The Music Lovers (1970), The Boy Friend (1971), Valentino (1977), Gothic (1986), and The Rainbow (1989)

terry

/ˈtɛrɪ/
noun (pl) -ries
1.
an uncut loop in the pile of towelling or a similar fabric
2.
  1. a fabric with such a pile on both sides
  2. (as modifier) a terry towel
Word Origin
C18: perhaps variant of terret

Terry

/ˈtɛrɪ/
noun
1.
Dame Ellen. 1847–1928, British actress, noted for her Shakespearean roles opposite Sir Henry Irving and for her correspondence with George Bernard Shaw
2.
(John) Quinlan (ˈkwɪnlən). born 1937, British architect, noted for his works in neoclassical style, such as the Richmond riverside project (1984)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bill
n.

"written statement," mid-14c., from Anglo-French bille, Anglo-Latin billa "list," from Medieval Latin bulla "decree, seal, sealed document," in classical Latin "bubble, boss, stud, amulet for the neck" (hence "seal;" see bull (n.2)). Sense of "account, invoice" first recorded c.1400; that of "order to pay" (technically bill of exchange) is from 1570s; that of "paper money" is from 1660s. Meaning "draft of an act of Parliament" is from 1510s.

"bird's beak," Old English bill "bill, bird's beak," related to bill, a poetic word for a kind of sword (especially one with a hooked blade), from a common Germanic word for cutting or chopping weapons (cf. Old High German bihal, Old Norse bilda "hatchet," Old Saxon bil "sword"), from PIE root *bheie- "to cut, to strike" (cf. Armenian bir "cudgel," Greek phitos "block of wood," Old Church Slavonic biti "to strike," Old Irish biail "ax"). Used also in Middle English of beak-like projections of land (e.g. Portland Bill).

ancient weapon, Old English bill "sword (especially one with a hooked blade), chopping tool," common Germanic (cf. Old Saxon bil "sword," Middle Dutch bile, Dutch bijl, Old High German bihal, German Beil, Old Norse bilda "hatchet." See bill (n.2).

v.

"to send someone a bill of charge," 1864, from bill (n.1). Related: Billed; billing.

terry

n.

"loop raised in pile-weaving, left uncut," 1784, possibly an alteration of French tiré "drawn," from past participle of tirer "draw out" (cf. German gezogener Sammet "drawn velvet").

Russell

masc. proper name, from Old French rous-el, diminutive of rous "red," used as a personal name. See russet.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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bill in Medicine

Evans Ev·ans (ěv'ənz), Herbert McLean. 1882-1971.

American anatomist who isolated four pituitary hormones and discovered vitamin E (1922).

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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bill in Science
Evans
  (ěv'ənz)   
American biologist who discovered vitamin E in 1922 and conducted research that led to the discovery of the growth hormone in the pituitary gland.
Russell
  (rŭs'əl)   
American astronomer who studied binary stars and developed methods to calculate their mass and distances. Working independently of Ejnar Hertzsprung, Russell also demonstrated the relationship between types of stars and their absolute magnitude. This correlation is now known as the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for bill

bill

noun
  1. A single dollar: Can I borrow a couple of bills until tomorrow? (1910+)
  2. A hundred dollars: I laid out four bills for that shearling (1920s+)
  3. A hundred yards of gain in football: Coach Jackson told me I needed two bills to win (1990s+ Football)
Related Terms

half bill, phony as a three-dollar bill


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Related Abbreviations for bill

terry

terry cloth
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Idioms and Phrases with bill
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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6
9
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