blenny

[blen-ee]
noun, plural blennies.
any of several fishes of the family Blenniidae and related families, especially of the genus Blennius, having a long, tapering body and small pelvic fins inserted before the pectoral fins.

Origin:
1745–55; < Latin blennius a kind of fish < Greek blénnos slime, mucus; so called from its slimy coating

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World English Dictionary
blenny (ˈblɛnɪ)
 
n , pl -nies
1.  any blennioid fish of the family Blenniidae of coastal waters, esp of the genus Blennius, having a tapering scaleless body, a long dorsal fin, and long raylike pelvic fins
2.  any of various related fishes
 
[C18: from Latin blennius, from Greek blennos slime; from the mucus that coats its body]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

blenny
1774, from L. blennius (in Pliny), from Gk. blennos, from blenna "slime, mucus," of unknown origin; the fish so called from the coating on its scales.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Three of the fish had silversides in their bellies, and one had a small blenny.
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