bloomer

1 [bloo-mer]
noun
1.
a costume for women, advocated about 1850 by Amelia Jenks Bloomer, consisting of a short skirt, loose trousers gathered and buttoned at the ankle, and often a coat and a wide hat.
2.
bloomers, (used with a plural verb)
a.
loose trousers gathered at the knee, formerly worn by women as part of a gymnasium, riding, or other sports outfit.
b.
women's underpants of similar, but less bulky, design.
c.
the trousers of a bloomer costume.
d.
any of various women's garments with full-cut legs gathered at the bottom edge.
adjective
3.
(of a woman's garment) having full-cut legs gathered at the bottom edge: bloomer shorts.

Origin:
1850–55, Americanism; named after A.J. Bloomer

Dictionary.com Unabridged

bloomer

2 [bloo-mer]
noun
1.
a plant that blooms: a night bloomer.
2.
a person who develops skills, abilities, interests, etc., commensurate with his or her capacities: a quiet, methodical child who became a late bloomer.

Origin:
1720–30; bloom1 + -er1

bloomer

3 [bloo-mer]
noun
a foolish mistake; blunder.

Origin:
1885–90; bloom(ing) (as euphemism for bloody) + -er1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
bloomer1 (ˈbluːmə)
 
n
a plant that flowers, esp in a specified way: a night bloomer

bloomer2 (ˈbluːmə)
 
n
informal (Brit) a stupid mistake; blunder
 
[C20: from blooming]

bloomer3 (ˈbluːmə)
 
n
(Brit) a medium-sized loaf, baked on the sole of the oven, glazed and notched on top
 
[C20: of uncertain origin]

bloomers (ˈbluːməz)
 
pl n
1.  informal women's or girls' baggy knickers
2.  (formerly) loose trousers gathered at the knee worn by women for cycling and athletics
3.  history Also called: rational dress long loose trousers gathered at the ankle and worn under a shorter skirt
 
[from bloomer, a garment introduced in about 1850 and publicized by Mrs A. Bloomer (1818--94), US social reformer]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

bloomers
1851, named for U.S. feminist reformer Amelia Jenks Bloomer (1818-1894), who promoted them.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

bloomers

lower part of a "rational dress" for women advocated by Amelia Jenks Bloomer (q.v.) in 1850. The entire costume consisted of a short jacket, a skirt extending below the knee, and the bloomers, or loose "Turkish" trousers, gathered at the ankles.

Learn more about bloomers with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Only problem is they are late bloomers and do not produce as much as some
  varieties.
It offers succor to late bloomers still unpublished well into their late
  twenties.
These cheery bloomers light up cool days with happy colors.
In fall, bulbs are interplanted with pansies and other spring bloomers.
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