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blur

[blur] /blɜr/
verb (used with object), blurred, blurring.
1.
to obscure or sully (something) by smearing or with a smeary substance:
The windows were blurred with soot.
2.
to obscure by making confused in form or outline; make indistinct:
The fog blurred the outline of the car.
3.
to dim the perception or susceptibility of; make dull or insensible:
The blow on the head blurred his senses.
verb (used without object), blurred, blurring.
4.
to become indistinct:
Everything blurred as she ran.
5.
to make blurs.
noun
6.
a smudge or smear that obscures:
a blur of smoke.
7.
a blurred condition; indistinctness:
They could see nothing in the foggy blur.
8.
something seen indistinctly:
The ship appeared as a blur against the horizon.
Origin
1540-1550
1540-50; akin to blear
Related forms
blurredly
[blur-id-lee, blurd-] /ˈblɜr ɪd li, ˈblɜrd-/ (Show IPA),
adverb
blurredness, noun
blurringly, adverb
unblurred, adjective
Synonyms
2. cloud, dim, darken, veil, mask.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for blur
  • Long exposure times increase the chance you'll blur the shot, whether through the subject's movement or yours.
  • All my birthday parties are a blur of cake and presents.
  • The first day of orientation in my doctoral program is still a blur.
  • The best seem to glide through the air from the waist up, but their feet are a blur.
  • She wiggles her head so much it practically becomes a blur.
  • When all else fails, try to embrace the blur that you have to accept anyway.
  • Try shooting at slow shutter speeds to deliberately blur your subject.
  • New studies show how such mental maps blur with age and readily extend to accommodate bionic limbs.
  • The case, for all its sensational elements, had begun to blur in the public's consciousness.
  • What is more, as computing becomes a utility, the borders between different systems are starting to blur.
British Dictionary definitions for blur

blur

/blɜː/
verb blurs, blurring, blurred
1.
to make or become vague or less distinct: heat haze blurs the hills, education blurs class distinctions
2.
to smear or smudge
3.
(transitive) to make (the judgment, memory, or perception) less clear; dim
noun
4.
something vague, hazy, or indistinct
5.
a smear or smudge
Derived Forms
blurred, adjective
blurredly (ˈblɜːrɪdlɪ; ˈblɜːd-) adverb
blurredness, noun
blurriness, noun
blurry, adjective
Word Origin
C16: perhaps variant of blear
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for blur
n.

1540s, "smear on the surface of writing;" perhaps akin to blear. Extended sense of "confused dimness" is from 1860.

v.

1580s, and thus probably from blur (n.), but the dates are close and either might be the original. Related: Blurred; blurring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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