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boggle1

[bog-uh l] /ˈbɒg əl/
verb (used with object), boggled, boggling.
1.
to overwhelm or bewilder, as with the magnitude, complexity, or abnormality of:
The speed of light boggles the mind.
2.
to bungle; botch.
verb (used without object), boggled, boggling.
3.
to hesitate or waver because of scruples, fear, etc.
4.
to start or jump with fear, alarm, or surprise; shrink; shy.
5.
to bungle awkwardly.
6.
to be overwhelmed or bewildered.
noun
7.
an act of shying or taking alarm.
8.
a scruple; demur; hesitation.
9.
bungle; botch.
Origin
1590-1600
1590-1600; perhaps from boggle2
Related forms
bogglingly, adverb

boggle2

[bog-uh l] /ˈbɒg əl/
noun
1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for boggle
  • But no, this whole thing doesn't make the mind boggle.
  • Even if you knew what to expect, its compact heft would still boggle your senses.
  • My mind does not easily boggle, but it's boggling now.
  • The quality common to the three movies is not comedy that makes one laugh but spectacle that is supposed to boggle the eyes.
  • It should boggle the mind of every member of this committee that individuals are treated this way.
British Dictionary definitions for boggle

boggle

/ˈbɒɡəl/
verb (intransitive) often foll by at
1.
to be surprised, confused, or alarmed (esp in the phrase the mind boggles)
2.
to hesitate or be evasive when confronted with a problem
3.
(transitive) to baffle; bewilder; puzzle
Word Origin
C16: probably variant of bogle1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for boggle
v.

1590s, "to start with fright" (as a startled horse does), from Middle English bugge "specter" (among other things, supposed to scare horses at night); see bug (n.); also cf. bogey (n.1). The meaning "to raise scruples, hesitate" is from 1630s. Related: Boggled; boggling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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