bork

bork

[bawrk]
verb (used with object)
to attack (a candidate or public figure) systematically, especially in the media.

Origin:
1988, Americanism; after Judge Robert H. Bork, whose appointment to the Supreme Court was blocked in 1987 after an extensive media campaign by his opponents

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Main Entry:  Bork
Part of Speech:  v
Definition:  to seek to obstruct a political appointment or selection; also, to attack a political opponent viciously
Etymology:  from the incident involving Robert Bork, US Supreme Court nominee in 1987
Usage:  politics
Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

bork
1987, "to discredit a candidate for some position by savaging his or her career and beliefs," from name of U.S. jurist Robert H. Bork (b.1927), whose Supreme Court nomination in 1987 was rejected after an intense counter-campaign.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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