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bourse

[boo rs] /bʊərs/
noun
1.
a stock exchange, especially the stock exchange of certain European cities.
Origin of bourse
1835-1845
1835-45; < French: literally, purse; see bursa
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for bourse
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Yet the bourse stands fast, and the decree is likely enough to be popular with the ouvrier class.

  • He got "Sunday specials" out of them both, and then went on to the bourse de Travail.

    The Harbor Ernest Poole
  • Juffrouw Krummel said she practiced with her husband when he came from the bourse.

    Walter Pieterse Multatuli
  • In the Paris bourse all agents are strictly forbidden to trade on their own account.

  • But a large number of enterprises were started in Germany of which the Berlin bourse knew nothing.

    The Great Illusion Norman Angell
  • bourse: the same as Exchange, where merchants meet to transact their business.

    The History of London Walter Besant
  • He often played baccarat: cards were lenient with his purse and the bourse with his pocketbook.

    Very Woman Remy de Gourmont
  • In 1794 the ground floor of the Petite Galerie was used as a bourse.

    The Story of Paris Thomas Okey
British Dictionary definitions for bourse

Bourse

/bʊəs/
noun
1.
a stock exchange of continental Europe, esp Paris
Word Origin
C19: from French, literally: purse, from Medieval Latin bursa, ultimately from Greek: leather
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bourse
n.

"stock exchange," 1570s, burse, from Old French borse "money bag, purse" (12c.), from Medieval Latin bursa "a bag" (see purse (n.)). French spelling and modern sense of "exchange for merchants" is first recorded 1845, from the name of the Paris stock exchange. The term originated because in 13c. Bruges the sign of a purse (or perhaps three purses), hung on the front of the house where merchants met.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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