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8 Words That Are Older Than You Think

brash

[brash] /bræʃ/
adjective, brasher, brashest. Also, brashy
1.
impertinent; impudent; tactless:
a brash young man.
2.
hasty; rash; impetuous.
3.
energetic or highly spirited, especially in an irreverent way; zesty:
a brash new musical.
4.
(used especially of wood) brittle.
noun
5.
a pile or stack of loose fragments or debris, as of rocks or hedge clippings.
6.
7.
Pathology, heartburn (def 1).
8.
Scot. and North England Dialect.
  1. a sudden shower or burst of rain.
  2. any sudden, minor sickness or indisposition, especially of the digestive tract.
  3. an assault; attack.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; (noun) late Middle English brass(c)he a slap, crash, perhaps blend of brok(e) (Old English broc breach, fragment, sickness; akin to break) and dasch smashing blow; see dash1; (adj.) in sense “brittle,” derivative of noun; in sense “hasty” by confusion with rash1
Related forms
brashly, adverb
brashness, noun
Synonyms
2. reckless, overhasty, imprudent, foolhardy, precipitate.
Antonyms
2. cautious, wary, prudent, careful.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for brash
  • Kirk was brash and emotional.
  • Some could read Barnes' statement as brash or rude, even unsportsmanlike.
  • He was known as brash and iconoclastic, and a fabulous teacher.
  • When the science community uses brash tactics to fend off skeptics, I smell desparation.
  • Once so brash, the city had lost much of its bounce, but was grimly determined to restore some semblance of normality.
  • There is nothing unethical or unbecoming for doomsayers to be brash if they have concrete evidences to support their predictions.
  • As always, there are at least two distinct sides to him: brash bully and charitable gentleman.
  • But some brash choices have come back to haunt her.
  • The brash outfielder certainly won't score any points with the organization for stiffing one of its best-known employees.
  • The brash youngsters again almost steal the show as the plot becomes tense and gripping.
British Dictionary definitions for brash

brash1

/bræʃ/
adjective
1.
tastelessly or offensively loud, showy, or bold
2.
hasty; rash
3.
impudent
Derived Forms
brashly, adverb
brashness, noun
Word Origin
C19: perhaps influenced by rash1

brash2

/bræʃ/
noun
1.
loose rubbish, such as broken rock, hedge clippings, etc; debris
Word Origin
C18: of unknown origin

brash3

/bræʃ/
noun
1.
(pathol) another name for heartburn
Word Origin
C16: perhaps of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for brash
adj.

1824, of obscure origin, originally American English; perhaps akin to 16c. Scottish brash "attack, assault," or French breche "fragments," especially of ice, from a Germanic source (cf. Old High German brehha "breach," from brehhan "to break"), or to German brechen "to vomit."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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