break-away

breakaway

[breyk-uh-wey]
noun
1.
an act or instance of breaking away; secession; separation: the breakaway of two provinces from a state.
2.
a departure or break from routine or tradition: a three-day breakaway in the Bahamas.
3.
a person or thing that breaks away.
4.
an object, as a theatrical prop, constructed so that it breaks or falls apart easily, especially upon impact.
5.
Ice Hockey. a sudden rush down the ice by a player or players in an attempt to score a goal, after breaking clear of defending opponents.
6.
Football. a run by an offensive player breaking through the defense for a long gain.
7.
Basketball. fast break.
8.
Australian.
a.
a stampede.
b.
an animal that breaks away from the herd or flock.
adjective
9.
of, pertaining to, or being that which separates or secedes: the breakaway faction of the Socialist party.
10.
departing from routine or tradition.
11.
constructed of such lightweight material or in such a way as to shatter or come apart easily: breakaway highway signposts; Build a breakaway set for the barroom brawl.
12.
(of theatrical costumes) constructed so as to be quickly removable, as by a performer playing several roles.

Origin:
1885–95; noun, adj. use of verb phrase break away

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
breakaway (ˈbreɪkəˌweɪ)
 
n
1.  a.  loss or withdrawal of a group of members from an association, club, etc
 b.  (as modifier): a breakaway faction
2.  sport
 a.  a sudden attack, esp from a defensive position, in football, hockey, etc
 b.  an attempt to get away from the rest of the field in a race
3.  (Austral) a stampede of cattle, esp at the smell of water
 
vb
4.  (often foll by from) to leave hastily or escape
5.  to withdraw or secede
6.  sport to make a breakaway
7.  horse racing to start prematurely

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

breakaway
1906 (n.), in reference to sports; 1930s (adj.) in reference to splinter groups; from break (v.) + away.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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