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[brooz] /bruz/
verb (used with object), bruised, bruising.
to injure by striking or pressing, without breaking the skin:
The blow bruised his arm. Her pinching bruised the peaches.
to injure or hurt slightly, as with an insult or unkind remark:
to bruise a person's feelings.
to crush (drugs or food) by beating or pounding.
Metalworking. to injure the surface of (an ingot or finished object) by collision.
verb (used without object), bruised, bruising.
to develop or bear a discolored spot on the skin as the result of a blow, fall, etc.
to become injured slightly:
His feelings bruise easily.
an injury due to bruising; contusion.
Origin of bruise
before 900; Middle English bro(o)sen, bres(s)en, bris(s)en, bruisen, representing Old English brȳsan, brēsan and Anglo-French bruser, Old French bruisier, akin to briser to break; see brisance
Related forms
unbruised, adjective
Can be confused
brews, bruise. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for bruise
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • In case of cut or bruise no remedy, I am told, is more efficacious, and certainly none more simple.

    A Year in a Lancashire Garden Henry Arthur Bright
  • Every sight and sound of the city seemed to bruise and hurt.

    The Root of Evil Thomas Dixon
  • It was also a peculiar shape, the centre standing out for all the world like a bruise on the forehead caused by a heavy blow.

    The Second String Nat Gould
  • He was cured of his fancy, although no effort of will could protect the soreness of the bruise.

    Robert Orange John Oliver Hobbes
  • He finally recovered from the effects of the bruise, and saw more of the war.

    Company G A. R. (Albert Rowe) Barlow
British Dictionary definitions for bruise


verb (mainly transitive)
(also intransitive) to injure (tissues) without breaking the skin, usually with discoloration, or (of tissues) to be injured in this way
to offend or injure (someone's feelings) by an insult, unkindness, etc
to damage the surface of (something), as by a blow
to crush (food, etc) by pounding or pressing
a bodily injury without a break in the skin, usually with discoloration; contusion
Word Origin
Old English brӯsan, of Celtic origin; compare Irish brūigim I bruise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bruise

Old English brysan "to crush, bruise, pound," from Proto-Germanic *brusjanan, from PIE root *bhreus- "to smash, crush" (cf. Old Irish bronnaim "I wrong, I hurt;" Breton brezel "war," Vulgar Latin brisare "to break"). Merged by 17c. with Anglo-French bruiser "to break, smash," from Old French bruisier "to break, shatter," perhaps from Gaulish *brus-, from the same PIE root. Related: Bruised; bruising.


1540s, from bruise (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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bruise in Medicine

bruise (brōōz)
An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is unbroken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations; a contusion.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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