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bruise

[brooz] /bruz/
verb (used with object), bruised, bruising.
1.
to injure by striking or pressing, without breaking the skin:
The blow bruised his arm. Her pinching bruised the peaches.
2.
to injure or hurt slightly, as with an insult or unkind remark:
to bruise a person's feelings.
3.
to crush (drugs or food) by beating or pounding.
4.
Metalworking. to injure the surface of (an ingot or finished object) by collision.
verb (used without object), bruised, bruising.
5.
to develop or bear a discolored spot on the skin as the result of a blow, fall, etc.
6.
to become injured slightly:
His feelings bruise easily.
noun
7.
an injury due to bruising; contusion.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English bro(o)sen, bres(s)en, bris(s)en, bruisen, representing Old English brȳsan, brēsan and Anglo-French bruser, Old French bruisier, akin to briser to break; see brisance
Related forms
unbruised, adjective
Can be confused
brews, bruise.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for bruised
  • Recently, on a discipline-specific listserv, tempers flared and egos were bruised.
  • There, he shook hands with the crew and underwent a physical exam, which determined that he had only suffered a bruised nose.
  • The sheer velocity of his career has created aftershocks, and those who stood too close have sometimes been bruised.
  • The strains among the principals, already battered and bruised, continued into postproduction.
  • But the episode has no doubt bruised pride at a company used to receiving acclaim in the press and online.
  • Eventually, some whose confidence has been bruised by recession decide not to buy in at all.
  • As a result, bruised bodies are par for the course before a neophyte gets to grips with the basic technique.
  • Harmless flirtations could improve your spirits and soothe your bruised ego.
  • Writers are sensitive souls--generally intelligent and hardworking but easily bruised.
  • Police found their badly bruised bodies on the floors of their apartments.
British Dictionary definitions for bruised

bruise

/bruːz/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
(also intransitive) to injure (tissues) without breaking the skin, usually with discoloration, or (of tissues) to be injured in this way
2.
to offend or injure (someone's feelings) by an insult, unkindness, etc
3.
to damage the surface of (something), as by a blow
4.
to crush (food, etc) by pounding or pressing
noun
5.
a bodily injury without a break in the skin, usually with discoloration; contusion
Word Origin
Old English brӯsan, of Celtic origin; compare Irish brūigim I bruise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bruised

bruise

v.

Old English brysan "to crush, bruise, pound," from Proto-Germanic *brusjanan, from PIE root *bhreus- "to smash, crush" (cf. Old Irish bronnaim "I wrong, I hurt;" Breton brezel "war," Vulgar Latin brisare "to break"). Merged by 17c. with Anglo-French bruiser "to break, smash," from Old French bruisier "to break, shatter," perhaps from Gaulish *brus-, from the same PIE root. Related: Bruised; bruising.

n.

1540s, from bruise (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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bruised in Medicine

bruise (brōōz)
n.
An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is unbroken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations; a contusion.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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