bubonic

[byoo-bon-ik, boo-]
adjective Pathology.
1.
of or pertaining to a bubo.
2.
accompanied by or affected with buboes.

Origin:
1870–75; < Late Latin būbōn- (stem of būbō) bubo + -ic

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World English Dictionary
bubo (ˈbjuːbəʊ)
 
n , pl -boes
pathol inflammation and swelling of a lymph node, often with the formation of pus, esp in the region of the armpit or groin
 
[C14: from Medieval Latin bubō swelling, from Greek boubōn groin, glandular swelling]
 
bubonic
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

bubonic
"characterized by swelling in the groin," 1871, from L. bubo (gen. bubonis) "swelling of lymph glands" (in the groin), from Gk. boubon "groin."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

bubonic bu·bon·ic (bōō-bŏn'ĭk, byōō-)
adj.
Of or relating to a bubo.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
Simple pneumonia could be as lethal as the bubonic plague.
Prevailing theory suggests that this mutation was perpetuated by the selective
  pressure of another disease, the bubonic plague.
It takes three forms: pneumonic, bubonic, and septicemic.
Also lurking in the background is another of the human race's great enemies:
  bubonic plague.
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