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bunch

[buhnch] /bʌntʃ/
noun
1.
a connected group; cluster:
a bunch of grapes.
2.
a group of things:
a bunch of papers.
3.
Informal. a group of people:
They're a fine bunch of students.
4.
a knob; lump; protuberance.
verb (used with object)
5.
to group together; make a bunch of.
verb (used without object)
6.
to gather into a cluster; gather together.
7.
(of fabric or clothing) to gather into folds (often followed by up).
Origin of bunch
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English bunche; of uncertain origin
Related forms
unbunched, adjective
Synonyms
1, 2. lot, batch. See bundle.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for bunches
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The bunches of seed-vessels, or "ash-keys," as they are fancifully called, were pickled in salt and water and eaten in old times.

    Miscellanea Juliana Horatia Ewing
  • She stroked the sleek necks of the colts and handed them bunches of grass.

    The Gentleman From Indiana Booth Tarkington
  • bunches of sweet herbs hung from the rafters, but there were no cobwebs, because of Miss Hathaway's perfect housekeeping.

    Lavender and Old Lace Myrtle Reed
  • Clemence related that she had one day eaten three bunches of watercresses at her lunch.

    L'Assommoir Emile Zola
  • They were ornamented with bows of bright-colored ribbons, bunches of artificial flowers, and gold and silver tinsel butterflies.

  • McPike is noteworthy because of the large size of the berries and bunches.

British Dictionary definitions for bunches

bunches

/ˈbʌntʃɪz/
plural noun
1.
(Brit) a hairstyle in which hair is tied into two sections on either side of the head at the back

bunch

/bʌntʃ/
noun
1.
a number of things growing, fastened, or grouped together: a bunch of grapes, a bunch of keys
2.
a collection; group: a bunch of queries
3.
(informal) a group or company: a bunch of boys
4.
(archaic) a protuberance
verb
5.
(sometimes foll by up) to group or be grouped into a bunch
See also bunches
Word Origin
C14: of obscure origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bunches

bunch

n.

early 14c., "protuberance on the body, swelling," perhaps echoic of the sound of hitting and connected to bump (cf., possibly in similar relationship, hump/hunch).

The sense of "cluster" is mid-15c.; connection with the earlier sense is obscure, and this may be a separate word, perhaps through a nasalized form of Old French bouge (2), 15c., from Flemish boudje diminutive of boud "bundle." Meaning "a lot, a group" is from 1620s.

v.

"to bulge out," late 14c., from bunch (n.). Meaning "to gather up in a bunch" (transitive) is from 1828; sense of "to crowd together" (intransitive) is from 1873. Related: Bunched; bunching.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for bunches

bunch

noun

  1. A group of people (1600s+)
  2. A particular group or set, family, etc: I like my bunch, but yours is elitist (1902+)
  3. mob (1950s+)
  4. Money, esp a large sum; bundle: He must have paid a bunch for that mink
The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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bunches in the Bible

(1.) A bundle of twigs (Ex. 12:22). (2.) Bunch or cake of raisins (2 Sam. 16:1). (3.) The "bunch of a camel" (Isa. 30:6).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Word Value for bunches

14
17
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