bunch

[buhnch]
noun
1.
a connected group; cluster: a bunch of grapes.
2.
a group of things: a bunch of papers.
3.
Informal. a group of people: They're a fine bunch of students.
4.
a knob; lump; protuberance.
verb (used with object)
5.
to group together; make a bunch of.
verb (used without object)
6.
to gather into a cluster; gather together.
7.
(of fabric or clothing) to gather into folds (often followed by up ).

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English bunche; of uncertain origin

unbunched, adjective


1, 2. lot, batch. See bundle.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
bunch (bʌntʃ)
 
n
1.  a number of things growing, fastened, or grouped together: a bunch of grapes; a bunch of keys
2.  a collection; group: a bunch of queries
3.  informal a group or company: a bunch of boys
4.  archaic a protuberance
 
vb
5.  (sometimes foll by up) to group or be grouped into a bunch
 
[C14: of obscure origin]

bunches (ˈbʌntʃɪz)
 
pl n
(Brit) a hairstyle in which hair is tied into two sections on either side of the head at the back

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

bunch
early 14c., "protuberance on the body, swelling," perhaps echoic of the sound of hitting and connected to bump (cf., possibly, hump/hunch). As a verb meaning "to bulge out," from late 14c. The noun sense of "cluster" is mid-15c.; connection with the earlier sense is obscure, and this may be a separate
word, perhaps through O.Fr. bouge (2), 15c., from Flemish boudje dim. of boud "bundle." The verb meaning "to gather up in a bunch" (trans.) is from 1828; that of "to crowd together" (intrans.) is from 1873. Related: Bunched; bunching.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Bunch definition


(1.) A bundle of twigs (Ex. 12:22). (2.) Bunch or cake of raisins (2 Sam. 16:1). (3.) The "bunch of a camel" (Isa. 30:6).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
If there is a disturbance to the nest, rattle-ants pick up bunches of their
  brood and move them to safety.
Dense bunches of pollen grains cling to each other in gnarled clumps.
These group-saving individuals secrete a polymer that enables bunches of
  individuals to form floating mats.
Lone banana at bottom of bunches acts as plug to keep internal fluids
  circulating.
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