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buss

[buhs] /bʌs/
noun, verb (used with object), verb (used without object)
1.
kiss.
Origin of buss
1560-1570
1560-70; perhaps blend of obsolete bass kiss and obsolete cuss kiss (cognate with German Kuss; replacing Middle English, Old English coss (cognate with Old Norse koss))
Can be confused
bus, buss.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for buss
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Then I called every man to me whom I could see, and we went quickly to the place where this buss was, and she was just afloat.

    King Alfred's Viking Charles W. Whistler
  • Why, I vow, she was fire-hot angry: may be it was because I buss'd her.

    The Contrast Royall Tyler
  • Don't ye take it unkind I han't a buss'd thee yet—meant no slight indeed.

    Speed the Plough Thomas Morton
  • Dear aunt, said her kinsman, let's see you buss and be friends: since 'tis so, what signifies it?

    Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded Samuel Richardson
  • The driver of a buss is a prince of good fellows compared with a cabman.

    About London J. Ewing Ritchie
British Dictionary definitions for buss

buss

/bʌs/
noun, verb
1.
an archaic or dialect word for kiss
Word Origin
C16: probably of imitative origin; compare French baiser, German dialect Bussi little kiss

Buss

/bʌs/
noun
1.
Frances Mary. 1827–94, British educationalist; a pioneer of secondary education for girls, who campaigned for women's admission to university
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for buss
n.

"a kiss," 1560s; probably of imitative origin, as are Welsh and Gaelic bus "kiss, lip," French baiser "kiss" (12c., from Latin basiare), Spanish buz, German dialectal Buss.

v.

1570s, from buss (n.). Related: Bussed; bussing.

Kissing and bussing differ both in this,
We busse our wantons, but our wives we kisse.
[Robert Herrick, "Hesperides," 1648]

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for buss

buss

verb

To talk about; gossip over: Quit bussin' about my shoes

[1980s+ Teenagers; perhaps a survival of British dialect buss, ''mutter, murmur busily, buzz,'' attested from the 1500s]

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Word Value for buss

6
8
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