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buzz1

[buhz] /bʌz/
noun
1.
a low, vibrating, humming sound, as of bees, machinery, or people talking.
2.
a rumor or report.
3.
Informal. a phone call:
When I find out, I'll give you a buzz.
4.
Slang.
  1. a feeling of intense enthusiasm, excitement, or exhilaration:
    I got a terrific buzz from those Pacific sunsets.
  2. a feeling of slight intoxication.
verb (used without object)
5.
to make a low, vibrating, humming sound.
6.
to speak or murmur with such a sound.
7.
to be filled with the sound of buzzing or whispering:
The room buzzed.
8.
to whisper; gossip:
Everyone is buzzing about the scandal.
9.
to move busily from place to place.
10.
Slang. to go; leave (usually followed by off or along):
I'll buzz along now. Tell him to buzz off and leave me alone.
verb (used with object)
11.
to make a buzzing sound with:
The fly buzzed its wings.
12.
to tell or spread (a rumor, gossip, etc.) secretively.
13.
to signal or summon with a buzzer:
He buzzed his secretary.
14.
Informal. to make a phone call to.
15.
Aeronautics.
  1. to fly a plane very low over:
    to buzz a field.
  2. to signal or greet (someone) by flying a plane low and slowing the motor spasmodically.
Idioms
16.
have / get a buzz on, Slang. to be slightly intoxicated:
After a few beers they all had a buzz on.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English busse; imitative
Related forms
buzzingly, adverb

buzz2

[buhz] /bʌz/
noun, Slang.
1.
a man's very short haircut; crew cut.
Origin
origin uncertain

Aldrin

[awl-drin] /ˈɔl drɪn/
noun
1.
Edwin Eugene, Jr ("Buzz") born 1930, U.S. astronaut.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for buzz
  • But at weekends the little gardens buzz with the sound of hedge-clippers and television sets.
  • Get the buzz on how flowers reproduce in this science cartoon.
  • Laughter and cheers cause a buzz of activity in brain regions that control facial movement.
  • Commercial greenhouses growers use electric vibration wands to do their own buzz pollination.
  • Over the past year, there has been a lot of buzz in the aviation industry over the use of alternative fuels.
  • Yet the election buzz continued, with parties dusting down campaign slogans and plans.
  • Light dances on the river, bamboo rustles, and dragonflies buzz.
  • Almost louder than the buzz of the shows, however, was the industry's fretting over its own future.
  • The discovery is creating a buzz throughout the astronomy community.
  • But they'll certainly release a film gradually to build buzz if it lacks star power.
British Dictionary definitions for buzz

buzz

/bʌz/
noun
1.
a rapidly vibrating humming sound, as that of a prolonged z or of a bee in flight
2.
a low sound, as of many voices in conversation
3.
a rumour; report; gossip
4.
(informal) a telephone call: I'll give you a buzz
5.
(slang)
  1. a pleasant sensation, as from a drug such as cannabis
  2. a sense of excitement; kick
verb
6.
(intransitive) to make a vibrating sound like that of a prolonged z
7.
(intransitive) to talk or gossip with an air of excitement or urgency: the town buzzed with the news
8.
(transitive) to utter or spread (a rumour)
9.
(intransitive) often foll by about. to move around quickly and busily; bustle
10.
(transitive) to signal or summon with a buzzer
11.
(transitive) (informal) to call by telephone
12.
(transitive) (informal)
  1. to fly an aircraft very low over (an object): to buzz a ship
  2. to fly an aircraft very close to or across the path of (another aircraft), esp to warn or intimidate
13.
(transitive) (esp of insects) to make a buzzing sound with (wings, etc)
See also buzz in
Derived Forms
buzzing, noun, adjective
Word Origin
C16: of imitative origin

aldrin

/ˈɔːldrɪn/
noun
1.
a brown to white poisonous crystalline solid, more than 95 per cent of which consists of the compound C12H8Cl6, which is used as an insecticide. Melting pt: 105°C
Word Origin
C20: named after K. Alder (1902–58) German chemist

Aldrin

/ˈɔːldrɪn/
noun
1.
Edwin Eugene Jr., known as Buzz. born 1930, US astronaut; the second man to set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969, during the Apollo 11 flight
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for buzz
v.

late 15c., echoic of bees and other insects. Aviation sense of "fly low and close" is by 1941 (see buzz (n.)). Related: Buzzed; buzzing. Buzz off (1914) originally meant "to ring off on the telephone," from the use of buzzers to signal a call or message on old systems. As a command, it originally would have been telling someone to get off the line.

n.

"a busy rumour" [Rowe], 1620s (earlier "a fancy," c.1600), figurative use from buzz (v.). Literal sense of "humming sound" is from 1640s. A "buzz" was the characteristic sound of an airplane in early 20c.; hence verbal sense "to fly swiftly," by 1928; by 1940 especially in military use, "to fly low over a surface as a warning signal" (e.g. that target practice is about to begin):

The patrol aircraft shall employ the method of warning known as "buzzing" which consists of low flight by the airplane and repeated opening and closing of the throttle. [1941 Supplement to the Code of Federal Regulations of the United States of America," Chap. II, Corps of Engineers, War Department, p. 3434, etc. ]
Meaning "pleasant sense of intoxication" first recorded 1935. The children's game of counting off with 7 or multiples of it replaced by buzz is attested from 1864 and is mentioned in "Little Women" (1868). To give (someone) a buzz (by 1922) is from the buzz that announced a call on old telephone systems.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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buzz in Science
aldrin
  (ôl'drĭn)   
A highly poisonous white powder used as a crop pesticide and to kill termites. Because of its toxicity to animals and humans, its production has been discontinued. Aldrin is a chlorinated derivative of naphthalene closely related to dieldrin. Chemical formula: C12H8Cl6.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for buzz

buzz

noun
  1. A telephone call: I think I'll give the Guided Child abuzz (1910+)
  2. ubject of talk; gossip; rumor: What's the buzz, cuz? (1605+)
  3. feeling or surge of pleasure, esp a pleasant sense of intoxication; high: After two Scotches he got a nice buzz (1935+)
  4. A police squad car (1950s+ Teenagers)
verb
  1. To call someone on the telephone; ring: Why not buzz Eddy for the brawl? (1910+)
  2. To talk; converse: The crowd was buzzing about some pretty raunchy divorces (1832+)
  3. To flatter; court (1900+)
  4. o inform someone in confidence, esp by whispering: You'll buzz me later (1950s+)
  5. To announce one's arrival or summon someone by or as if by sounding a buzzer: Buzz when you want me (1950s+)
  6. To beg (1920s+ Hoboes)
  7. To pilfer; rob; hold up (1812+ Underworld)
  8. To question or investigate someone (1930s+ Police & underworld)
  9. To fly an aircraft alarmingly close to something, esp to the ground •A sense ''to flutter or hover about, over, etc,'' is attested from 1650 (WWII air forces)
  10. To roister drunkenly at: They were all buzzing the bar (WWII armed forces)
  11. Kill; waste: They buzz the kid and her baby? (1990s+ Street gang)

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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buzz in Technology


1. Of a program, to run with no indication of progress and perhaps without guarantee of ever finishing; especially said of programs thought to be executing a tight loop of code. A program that is buzzing appears to be catatonic, but never gets out of catatonia, while a buzzing loop may eventually end of its own accord. "The program buzzes for about 10 seconds trying to sort all the names into order." See spin; see also grovel.
2. [ETA Systems] To test a wire or printed circuit trace for continuity by applying an AC rather than DC signal. Some wire faults will pass DC tests but fail a buzz test.
3. To process an array or list in sequence, doing the same thing to each element. "This loop buzzes through the tz array looking for a terminator type."
[Jargon File]

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Encyclopedia Article for buzz

aldrin

one of the several isomers (compounds with the same composition but different structures) of hexachlorohexahydrodimethanonaphthalene, a chlorinated hydrocarbon formerly used as an insecticide. Aldrin was first prepared in the late 1940s and is manufactured by the reaction of hexachlorocyclopentadiene with bicycloheptadiene (both derived from hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum). Aldrin stimulates the central nervous system and is toxic to warm-blooded animals; poisoning can result from ingestion, inhalation, or absorption through the skin

Learn more about aldrin with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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