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cackle

[kak-uh l] /ˈkæk əl/
verb (used without object), cackled, cackling.
1.
to utter a shrill, broken sound or cry, as of a hen.
2.
to laugh in a shrill, broken manner.
3.
to chatter noisily; prattle.
verb (used with object), cackled, cackling.
4.
to utter with cackles; express by cackling:
They cackled their disapproval.
noun
5.
the act or sound of cackling.
6.
chatter; idle talk.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English cakelen; cognate with Dutch kakelen, Low German kakeln, Swedish kackla
Related forms
cackler, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for cackle
  • Listen for a rooster pheasant cackle or insects buzzing.
  • cackle as huge clouds of cold-sublimating gas billow forth.
  • Somewhere about this point, the specter of determinism begins once again to flap and cackle.
  • Mingling glee with gloom, cackle with shriek, they have predicted the end of the firm itself.
  • The engine's cackle and rough idle suggest you're dealing with a temperamental machine.
  • But once in a while, he breaks into a whine, a cackle or a yelp.
  • There are times when a cackle of demoniac laughter is the sole salvation of sanity.
  • Yet tickling has remained little more than a cackle-filled curiosity far from the purview of modern science.
  • He began to cackle, which drew a frown from the sheriff.
  • Once a melodiously sculpted soprano, it is now no more beautiful than the cackle of an old hen.
British Dictionary definitions for cackle

cackle

/ˈkækəl/
verb
1.
(intransitive) (esp of a hen) to squawk with shrill notes
2.
(intransitive) to laugh or chatter raucously
3.
(transitive) to utter in a cackling manner
noun
4.
the noise or act of cackling
5.
noisy chatter
6.
(informal) cut the cackle, to stop chattering; be quiet
Derived Forms
cackler, noun
Word Origin
C13: probably from Middle Low German kākelen, of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cackle
v.

early 13c., imitative (see cachinnation); perhaps partly based on Middle Dutch kake "jaw." Related: Cackled; cackling. As a noun from 1670s. Cackleberries, slang for "eggs" is first recorded 1880.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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