caesura

[si-zhoor-uh, -zoor-uh, siz-yoor-uh]
noun, plural caesuras, caesurae [si-zhoor-ee, -zoor-ee, siz-yoor-ee] .
1.
Prosody. a break, especially a sense pause, usually near the middle of a verse, and marked in scansion by a double vertical line, as in know then thyselfpresume not God to scan.
2.
Classical Prosody. a division made by the ending of a word within a foot, or sometimes at the end of a foot, especially in certain recognized places near the middle of a verse.
3.
any break, pause, or interruption.
Also, cesura.


Origin:
1550–60; < Latin, equivalent to caes(us) cut (past participle of caedere) (caed- cut + -tus past participle suffix) + -ūra -ure

caesural, caesuric, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To caesura
Collins
World English Dictionary
caesura (sɪˈzjʊərə)
 
n , pl -ras, -rae
1.  Usual symbol: (in modern prosody) a pause, esp for sense, usually near the middle of a verse line
2.  (in classical prosody) a break between words within a metrical foot, usually in the third or fourth foot of the line
 
[C16: from Latin, literally: a cutting, from caedere to cut]
 
cae'sural
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

caesura
1550s, from L. caesura, "metrical pause," lit. "a cutting," from pp. stem of cædere "to cut down" (see cement).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

caesura

in modern prosody, a pause within a poetic line that breaks the regularity of the metrical pattern. It is represented in scansion by the sign . The caesura sometimes is used to emphasize the formal metrical construction of a line, but it more often introduces the cadence of natural speech patterns and habits of phrasing into the metrical scheme. The caesura may coincide with conventional punctuation marks, as in the following Shakespearean line, in which a strong pause is demanded after each comma for rhetorical expression: This blessed plot,this earth,this realm,this England,

Learn more about caesura with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Example sentences for caesura
The first possible caesura that one encounters in a line is considered the main caesura.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;