caisson

[key-suhn, -son]
noun
1.
a structure used in underwater work, consisting of an airtight chamber, open at the bottom and containing air under sufficient pressure to exclude the water.
2.
a boatlike structure used as a gate for a dock or the like.
3.
Nautical.
a.
Also called camel, pontoon. a float for raising a sunken vessel, sunk beside the vessel, made fast to it, and then pumped out to make it buoyant.
b.
a watertight structure built against a damaged area of a hull to render the hull watertight; cofferdam.
4.
a two-wheeled wagon, used for carrying artillery ammunition.
5.
an ammunition chest.
6.
a wooden chest containing bombs or explosives, used formerly as a mine.
7.
Architecture, coffer ( def 4 ).

Origin:
1695–1705; < French, Middle French < Old Provençal, equivalent to caissa box (see case2) + -on augmentative suffix

caissoned, adjective
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World English Dictionary
caisson (kəˈsuːn, ˈkeɪsən)
 
n
1.  a watertight chamber open at the bottom and containing air under pressure, used to carry out construction work under water
2.  a similar unpressurized chamber
3.  See also camel a watertight float filled with air, used to raise sunken ships
4.  a watertight structure placed across the entrance of a basin, dry dock, etc, to exclude water from it
5.  a.  a box containing explosives, formerly used as a mine
 b.  an ammunition chest
 c.  a two-wheeled vehicle containing an ammunition chest
6.  another name for coffer
 
[C18: from French, assimilated to caissecase²]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

caisson
1704, from Fr. caisson "ammunition wagon, box, crate," from M.Fr. caisson "large box" (16c.), from It. cassone, augmentive form of cassa "a chest," from L. capsa "a box" (see case (2)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
To make an oil-collecting caisson, such a pile would be used as a collar around
  a funnel-topped tube that would sit over the leak.
Once the entire crowd was in place, the pallbearers came to attention and began
  to remove the casket from the caisson.
Also, the timber member at the northwest caisson or cylinder pier was badly
  decayed.
Caisson repair work would include the installation of a caisson support floor
  and of a new seaward-facing wall.
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