calaboose

calaboose

[kal-uh-boos, kal-uh-boos]
noun Slang.
jail; prison; lockup.

Origin:
1785–95, Americanism; (< North American F) < Spanish calabozo dungeon, of obscure origin

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World English Dictionary
calaboose (ˈkæləˌbuːs)
 
n
informal (US) a prison; jail
 
[C18: from Creole French, from Spanish calabozo dungeon, of unknown origin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

calaboose
"prison," 1792, Amer.Eng., from Louisiana Fr. calabouse, from Sp. calabozo "dungeon," probably from V.L. *calafodium, from pre-Roman *cala "protected place, den" + L. fodere "to dig" (see fossil).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

calaboose definition

[ˈkæləbus]
  1. n.
    jail. (From a Spanish word.) : Are we going to tell what happened, or are we going to spend the night in the calaboose?
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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