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Denotation vs. Connotation

candid

[kan-did] /ˈkæn dɪd/
adjective
1.
frank; outspoken; open and sincere:
a candid critic.
2.
free from reservation, disguise, or subterfuge; straightforward:
a candid opinion.
3.
informal; unposed:
a candid photo.
4.
honest; impartial:
a candid mind.
5.
Archaic. white.
6.
Archaic. clear; pure.
noun
7.
an unposed photograph.
Origin of candid
1620-1630
1620-30; (< French candide) < Latin candidus shining white, equivalent to cand(ēre) to be shining white (akin to incense1) + -idus -id4
Related forms
candidly, adverb
candidness, noun
pseudocandid, adjective
pseudocandidly, adverb
quasi-candid, adjective
quasi-candidly, adverb
subcandid, adjective
subcandidly, adverb
subcandidness, noun
supercandid, adjective
supercandidly, adverb
supercandidness, noun
uncandid, adjective
uncandidly, adverb
uncandidness, noun
Synonyms
1. ingenuous, naive, plain. See frank1 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for candid
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I ought to render a candid account here of the impression made upon me by those two deluges of ink, Goldoni and Chiari.

  • For the first time Kingozi's careless, candid stare narrowed to a focus.

    The Leopard Woman Stewart Edward White
  • He was known to have expressed privately a candid opinion that they were a knot of damned Gladstonians.

    Lord Randolph Churchill Winston Spencer Churchill
  • Who could be so brutal as to blame so amiable, so candid a creature?

  • When obliged to see that he had judged wrongly, his silence was the only confession: he was seldom equal to a candid apology.

British Dictionary definitions for candid

candid

/ˈkændɪd/
adjective
1.
frank and outspoken: he was candid about his dislike of our friends
2.
without partiality; unbiased
3.
unposed or informal: a candid photograph
4.
(obsolete)
  1. white
  2. clear or pure
Derived Forms
candidly, adverb
candidness, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Latin candidus white, from candēre to be white
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for candid
adj.

1620s, "white," from Latin candidum "white; pure; sincere, honest, upright," from candere "to shine," from PIE root *kand- "to glow, to shine" (see candle). In English, metaphoric extension to "frank" first recorded 1670s (cf. French candide "open, frank, ingenuous, sincere"). Of photography, 1929. Related: Candidly; candidness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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