Canonicals

canonical

[kuh-non-i-kuhl]
adjective Also, canonic.
1.
pertaining to, established by, or conforming to a canon or canons.
2.
included in the canon of the Bible.
3.
authorized; recognized; accepted: canonical works.
4.
Mathematics. (of an equation, coordinate, etc.) in simplest or standard form.
5.
following the pattern of a musical canon.
6.
Linguistics. (of a form or pattern) characteristic, general or basic: the canonical form of the past tense; a canonical syllable pattern.
noun
7.
canonicals, garments prescribed by canon law for clergy when officiating.

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin canōnicālis, equivalent to canōnic(us) (see canon2) + -ālis -al1

canonically, adverb
supercanonical, adjective
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World English Dictionary
canonical or canonic (kəˈnɒnɪkəl)
 
adj
1.  belonging to or included in a canon of sacred or other officially recognized writings
2.  belonging to or in conformity with canon law
3.  according to recognized law; accepted
4.  music in the form of a canon
5.  of or relating to a cathedral chapter
6.  of or relating to a canon (clergyman)
 
canonic or canonic
 
adj
 
ca'nonically or canonic
 
adv

canonicals (kəˈnɒnɪkəlz)
 
pl n
the vestments worn by clergy when officiating

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

canonical
early 15c., from M.L. canonicalis, from canonicus, from Gk. kanonikos (see canon). Earlier was canonial (early 13c.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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