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Capua

[kap-yoo-uh; Italian kah-pwah] /ˈkæp yu ə; Italian ˈkɑ pwɑ/
noun
1.
a town in NW Campania, in S Italy, N of Naples.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for Capua

Capua

/ˈkæpjʊə; Italian ˈkapua/
noun
1.
a town in S Italy, in NW Campania: strategically important in ancient times, situated on the Appian Way. Pop: 19 041 (2001)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Encyclopedia Article for Capua

in ancient times, the chief city of the Campania region of Italy; it was located 16 miles (26 km) north of Neapolis (Naples) on the site of modern Santa Maria Capua Vetere. The nearby modern city of Capua was called Casilinum in antiquity. Ancient Capua was founded in c. 600 BC, probably by the Etruscans, and came to dominate many of the surrounding communities (e.g., Casilinum, Calatia, and Atella). After the period of Etruscan domination, it fell to the Samnites, an Italic people (c. 440 BC). The people of Capua spoke the Oscan dialect of Italic. They supported the Latin Confederacy in its war against Rome in 340 BC. After Rome's victory in the war, Capua passed under Roman control as a municipium (self-governing community), and its people were granted limited Roman citizenship (without the vote). The city kept its own magistrates and language. In 312 BC Capua was connected with Rome by the Appian Way (Via Appia). Its prosperity increased and it became the second city of Italy, famous for its bronzes and perfumes. During the Second Punic War (218-201 BC) Capua sided with Carthage against Rome. When the Romans recaptured the city in 211 BC, they deprived its citizens of political rights and replaced their magistrates with Roman prefects. The Roman colonies of Volturnum and Liternum were founded on Capuan territory in 194 BC. Spartacus, the slave leader, began his revolt at Capua in 73 BC. Although it suffered during the Roman civil wars in the last decades of the republic, it prospered under the empire (after 27 BC). The Vandals under Gaiseric sacked Capua in AD 456; later Muslim invaders (c. 840) destroyed everything except the church of Sta. Maria, which gave its name to the medieval and modern town.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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