caress

[kuh-res]
noun
1.
an act or gesture expressing affection, as an embrace or kiss, especially a light stroking or touching.
verb (used with object)
2.
to touch or pat gently to show affection.
3.
to touch, stroke, etc., lightly, as if in affection: The breeze caressed the trees.
4.
to treat with favor, kindness, etc.

Origin:
1605–15; < French caresse < Italian carezza < Vulgar Latin *caritia, equivalent to Latin cār(us) dear + -itia suffix of abstract nouns; cf. charity

caressable, adjective
caresser, noun
caressingly, adverb
uncaressed, adjective
uncaressing, adjective
uncaressingly, adverb


1. pat, fondling, hug.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
caress (kəˈrɛs)
 
n
1.  a gentle touch or embrace, esp one given to show affection
 
vb
2.  (tr) to touch or stroke gently with affection or as with affection: the wind caressed her face
 
[C17: from French caresse, from Italian carezza, from Latin cārus dear]
 
ca'resser
 
n
 
ca'ressingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

caress
1651, from Fr. caresser, from It. carezzare "endearment," ult. from L. carita, from carus "dear" (see whore).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Touch screens respond to the ceaseless caress of our fingers.
Snails caress each other with their antennae, birds touch beaks, and many
  mammals lick each other's snouts.
They stroke the keys in the piano room and they caress violins in the
  auditorium.
Wielding a single hair on a brush, a researcher tests the effects of a caress
  on skin.
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