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cargo

[kahr-goh] /ˈkɑr goʊ/
noun, plural cargoes, cargos.
1.
the lading or freight of a ship, airplane, etc.
2.
load.
3.
cargos, pants or shorts having several cargo pockets to hold bulky gear and small items.
adjective
4.
of or denoting a style of pants or shorts with cargo pockets.
Origin
1640-1650
1640-50; < Spanish: a load, noun derivative of cargar to load < Late Latin carricāre; see charge
Synonyms
1. See freight. 2. burden.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for cargo
  • There's more than a little touch of cargo cult and ghost dance dreaming here.
  • Some of the world's leading airlines are under investigation for alleged price-fixing by their cargo divisions.
  • Large boats have tanks in their hulls that are filled with seawater to counterbalance cargo weight.
  • Those bath toys and sneakers have come from container ships that lost their cargo.
  • You'll see a cargo magnolia, which provides sweet scents in spring.
  • If you haven't heard of cargo cult, let me summarize super quick.
  • They're big and rugged, and can carry lots of cargo.
  • So he insisted that it be easily convertible to a cargo plane.
  • Though the book is too big for a pants pocket-well, it might fit into cargo pockets-it's obviously made for field use.
  • The bombs discovered in the holds of two cargo planes earlier this week validate the first of these worries.
British Dictionary definitions for cargo

cargo

/ˈkɑːɡəʊ/
noun (pl) -goes, -gos
1.
  1. goods carried by a ship, aircraft, or other vehicle; freight
  2. (as modifier): a cargo vessel
2.
any load: the train pulled in with its cargo of new arrivals
Word Origin
C17: from Spanish: from cargar to load, from Late Latin carricāre to load a vehicle, from carruscar
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cargo
n.

1650s, "freight loaded on a ship," from Spanish cargo "burden," from cargar "to load, impose taxes," from Late Latin carricare "to load on a cart" (see charge (v.)). South Pacific cargo cult is from 1949. Cargo pants attested from 1977.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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