follow Dictionary.com

11 Trending Words of 2014

cartridge

[kahr-trij] /ˈkɑr trɪdʒ/
noun
1.
Also called cartouche. a cylindrical case of pasteboard, metal, or the like, for holding a complete charge of powder, and often also the bullet or the shot for a rifle, machine gun, or other small arm.
2.
a case containing any explosive charge, as for blasting.
3.
any small container for powder, liquid, or gas, made for ready insertion into some device or mechanism:
an ink cartridge for a pen.
4.
Also called magazine. Photography. a lightproof metal or plastic container for a roll of film, usually containing both the supply and take-up spools, as well as a pressure plate, for rapid loading without the necessity of threading the film.
5.
Audio. pickup (def 8).
6.
a flat, compact container enclosing an endless loop of audiotape, operated by inserting into a slot in a player.
Origin
1570-1580
1570-80; earlier cartage, cartrage, alteration of cartouche
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for cartridge
  • Printer then flashes red light, demanding new cartridge.
  • If a gun is recovered, a forensic scientist test-fires it to determine the markings it leaves on bullets and cartridge casings.
  • It has a cartridge if you are held under the water, you can inflate the suit to bring you safely to the surface.
  • Both burners are fed by a single, thread-on fuel cartridge.
  • Change the filter cartridge regularly as recommended by the manufacturer.
  • Many modern photo printers allow the use of an optional photo cartridge.
  • If you open the camera in the middle of a roll, the film automatically spools safely back into the cartridge.
  • Each change would result in different markings on the cartridge.
  • The software comes on a standard game cartridge, and provides a variety of read-outs and diagnostic options.
  • But the cartridge's aim must be improved in order to enable it to trigger individual neurons.
British Dictionary definitions for cartridge

cartridge

/ˈkɑːtrɪdʒ/
noun
1.
a cylindrical, usually metal casing containing an explosive charge and often a bullet, for a rifle or other small arms
2.
a case for an explosive, such as a blasting charge
3.
an electromechanical transducer in the pick-up of a record player, usually either containing a piezoelectric crystal (crystal cartridge) or an electromagnet (magnetic cartridge)
4.
a container for magnetic tape that is inserted into a tape deck in audio or video systems. It is about four times the size of a cassette
5.
(photog) Also called cassette, magazine. a light-tight film container that enables a camera to be loaded and unloaded in normal light
6.
(computing) a removable unit in a printer which contains black or coloured ink
7.
(computing) a removable unit in a computer, such as an integrated circuit, containing software
Word Origin
C16: from earlier cartage, variant of cartouche (cartridge)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for cartridge
n.

1570s, cartage, corruption of French cartouche "a full charge for a pistol," originally wrapped in paper (16c.), from Italian cartoccio "roll of paper," an augmentative form of Medieval Latin carta "paper" (see card (n.)). The notion is of a roll of paper containing a charge for a firearm. The modern form of the English word is recorded from 1620s. Extended broadly 20c. to other small containers and their contents.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Article for cartridge

in weaponry, unit of small-arms ammunition, composed of a metal (usually brass) case, a propellant charge, a projectile or bullet, and a primer. The first cartridges, appearing in the second half of the 16th century, consisted merely of charges of powder wrapped in paper; the ball was loaded separately. During the next century, methods of including the ball with the powder were devised. In muzzle-loading a musket, the soldier bit off the end of the paper cartridge, poured a small amount of the powder into the firing pan, poured the rest down the barrel, and rammed the ball and paper down after it.

Learn more about cartridge with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for cartridge

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for cartridge

13
15
Scrabble Words With Friends