Catawba

Catawba

[kuh-taw-buh]
noun
1.
a Siouan language of North and South Carolina.
2.
a river flowing from W North Carolina into South Carolina, where it becomes the Wateree River. Compare Wateree.
3.
Horticulture.
a.
a reddish variety of grape.
b.
the vine bearing this fruit, grown in the eastern U.S.
4.
a light, dry, white wine made from this grape.

Origin:
1710–20, Americanism; apparently ultimately < Catawba (yį́) kátapu a village name, literally, (people of) the fork; perhaps via Shawnee kata·pa

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To catawba
Collins
World English Dictionary
Catawba (kəˈtɔːbə)
 
n , -ba, -bas
1.  a member of a North American Indian people, formerly of South Carolina, now almost extinct
2.  their language, belonging to the Siouan family
3.  a cultivated variety of red North American grape, widely grown in the eastern US
4.  the wine made from these grapes

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Catawba
type of grape, 1857, from river in South Carolina, U.S., where it was found. The river is names for the Katahba Indian group and language (Siouan), from katapu "fork of a stream," itself a Muskogean loan-word.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;