cater

[key-ter]
verb (used without object)
1.
to provide food, service, etc., as for a party or wedding: to cater for a banquet.
2.
to provide or supply what amuses, is desired, or gives pleasure, comfort, etc. (usually followed by to or for ): to cater to popular demand; to cater to an invalid.
verb (used with object)
3.
to provide food and service for: to cater a party.

Origin:
1350–1400; v. use of obsolete cater, Middle English catour, aphetic variant of acatour buyer < Anglo-French, equivalent to acat(er) to buy (see cate) + -our -or2

cateringly, adverb
uncatered, adjective
uncatering, adjective


2. humor, indulge, please.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
cater (ˈkeɪtə)
 
vb (when intr, foll by for)
1.  (intr; foll by for or to) to provide what is required or desired (for): to cater for a need; cater to your tastes
2.  to provide food, services, etc (for): we cater for parties; to cater a banquet
 
[C16: from earlier catour purchaser, variant of acatour, from Anglo-Norman acater to buy, ultimately related to Latin acceptāre to accept]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cater
1600, from M.E. catour (n.) "buyer of provisions" (c.1400), aphetic for Anglo-Fr. achatour (O.N.Fr. acatour), from O.Fr. achater "to buy," orig. "to buy provisions," perhaps from V.L. *accaptare, from L. ad- "to" + captare "to take, hold," freq. of capere "to take" (see
capable). Or else from V.L. *accapitare "to add to one's capital," from verbal stem of L. caput (gen. capitis). See capital.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Here is a list of six perfectly good options, each of which cater to different audiences but provide good service.
As a result, this spring has been stronger than ever for many businesses that
  cater to them.
These stores certainly still exist but the survivors seem more and more to
  cater to the antiquarian trade.
She roams around town, but often alights at oases that cater to nomads.
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