cauldron

[kawl-druhn]
noun
a large kettle or boiler.
Also, caldron.


Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English, alteration (by association with Latin caldus warm) of Middle English cauderon < Anglo-French, equivalent to caudere (< Late Latin caldāria; see caldera) + -on noun suffix

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World English Dictionary
cauldron or caldron (ˈkɔːldrən)
 
n
a large pot used for boiling, esp one with handles
 
[C13: from earlier cauderon, from Anglo-French, from Latin caldārium hot bath, from calidus warm]
 
caldron or caldron
 
n
 
[C13: from earlier cauderon, from Anglo-French, from Latin caldārium hot bath, from calidus warm]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cauldron
c.1300, caudron, from Anglo-Fr. caudrun, O.N.Fr. cauderon (O.Fr. chauderon; cf. Sp. calderon, It. calderone), from augmentative of L.L. caldaria "cooking pot," from L. calidarium "hot bath," from calidus "warm, hot" (see calorie). The -l- was inserted 15c. in imitation of Latin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Pure tin is mixed with its additional components in a large cauldron and slowly
  melted.
Rather, it is a roiling, seething cauldron of evanescent particles.
Because in the roiling cauldron of activity that governs galaxy formation, some
  stars go supernova.
Emotions are finally settling down in the entertainment industry's bubbling
  cauldron of labor disputes.
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