cause-and-effect

Use Cause-and-effect in a sentence

cause-and-effect

[kawz-uhnd-i-fekt, -uhn-]
adjective
noting a relationship between actions or events such that one or more are the result of the other or others.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Example sentences
To be sure, there is neither a simple nor linear cause-and-effect relationship between social psychology and historical events.
The researchers point out that this was an observational study, so no cause-and-effect relationship can be established.
So no, neither truly belong in the realm of science, which is about finding the answers through cause-and-effect and observation.
What they have uncovered is a correlation, not a rock solid cause-and-effect, but their data so far look pretty good.
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