caveat

[kav-ee-aht, -at, kah-vee-, key-]
noun
1.
a warning or caution; admonition.
2.
Law. a legal notice to a court or public officer to suspend a certain proceeding until the notifier is given a hearing: a caveat filed against the probate of a will.

Origin:
< Latin: let him beware, 3rd person singular present subjunctive of cavēre to take care; see caution

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World English Dictionary
caveat (ˈkeɪvɪˌæt, ˈkæv-)
 
n
1.  law a formal notice requesting the court or officer to refrain from taking some specified action without giving prior notice to the person lodging the caveat
2.  a warning; caution
 
[C16: from Latin, literally: let him beware]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

caveat
1549, from L. "let him beware," 3rd pers. sing. pres. subjunctive of cavere "to beware, take heed, watch, guard against," from PIE base *skeue- "to pay attention, perceive" (cf. Skt. kavih "wise, sage, seer, poet;" Lith. kavoti "tend, safeguard;" Arm. cucanem "I show;" L. cautio "wariness;" Gk. koein
"to mark, perceive, hear," kydos "glory, fame," lit. "that which is heard of;" O.C.S. chujo "to feel, perceive, hear," cudo "wonder," lit. "that which is heard of;" Czech (z)koumati "to perceive, be aware of;" Serbian chuvati "watch, heed;" O.E. sceawian "to look at;" M.Du. schoon "beautiful, bright," prop. "showy;" Goth. hausjan "hear").
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Yes, caveat emptor applies, ie there is an onus on the buyer to understand what
  they are doing with their data.
With one tiny caveat: it roughly connects those two areas.
It could, with the caveat that the transmitter and receiver need to remain
  coherent with each other.
He will give a colorful, sometimes near-legendary account of an event, then
  undercut it with a well-researched caveat.
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