caviar

[kav-ee-ahr, kav-ee-ahr]
noun
the roe of sturgeon, especially the beluga, or other fish, usually served as an hors d'oeuvre or appetizer.
Also, caviare.


Origin:
1585–95; apparently back formation from caviarie (taken, perhaps rightly, as caviar + plural ending, Latin or Italian -i), of uncertain origin; compare Italian caviaro, Turkish havyar

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caviar or caviare (ˈkævɪˌɑː, ˌkævɪˈɑː, ˈkævɪˌɑː, ˌkævɪˈɑː)
 
n
the salted roe of sturgeon, esp the beluga, usually served as an hors d'oeuvre
 
[C16: from earlier cavery, from Old Italian caviari, plural of caviaro caviar, from Turkish havyār]
 
caviare or caviare
 
n
 
[C16: from earlier cavery, from Old Italian caviari, plural of caviaro caviar, from Turkish havyār]

CAVIAR (ˈkævɪˌɑː)
 
n acronym for
Cinema and Video Industry Audience Research

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

caviar
c.1560, from Fr. caviar, from It. or Turk., from Pers. khaviyar, from khaya "egg" (from M.Pers. khayak "egg," from Old Iranian *qvyaka-, dim. of *avya-, from PIE *owyo-/*oyyo- "egg") + dar "bearing."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
And the roe or eggs of the sturgeon were prepared through a salting process to
  become caviar.
The eggs of certain fish, mainly sturgeon, are prepared as a delicacy known as
  caviar.
Paddlefish were once an important commercial species and even replaced sturgeon
  as the major source of eggs for caviar.
And if along the way you want to gorge on caviar or get a tattoo, that's
  entirely up to you.
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