cedar

[see-der]
noun
1.
any of several Old World, coniferous trees of the genus Cedrus, having wide, spreading branches. Compare cedar of Lebanon.
2.
any of various junipers, as the red cedar, Juniperus virginiana, of the cypress family, having reddish-brown bark and dark-blue, berrylike fruit.
3.
any of various other coniferous trees. Compare incense cedar, white cedar.
4.
any of several trees belonging to the genus Cedrela, of the mahogany family, as the Spanish cedar.
5.
Also called cedarwood. the fragrant wood of any of these trees, used in furniture and as a moth repellent.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English cedir, Old English ceder < Latin cedrus < Greek kédros; replacing Middle English cedre < Old French < Latin, as above

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To cedar
Collins
World English Dictionary
cedar (ˈsiːdə)
 
n
1.  cedar of Lebanon See also deodar any Old World coniferous tree of the genus Cedrus, having spreading branches, needle-like evergreen leaves, and erect barrel-shaped cones: family Pinaceae
2.  any of various other conifers, such as the red cedars and white cedars
3.  the wood of any of these trees
4.  any of certain other plants, such as the Spanish cedar
 
adj
5.  made of the wood of a cedar tree
 
[C13: from Old French cedre, from Latin cedrus, from Greek kedros]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cedar
O.E. ceder, blended with L. cedrus, from Gk. kedros "cedar, juniper," origin uncertain.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

Cedar definition


A superset of Mesa, from Xerox PARC, adding garbage collection, dynamic types and a universal pointer type (REF ANY). Cedar is a large complex language designed for custom Xerox hardware and the Cedar operating system/environment. Data types are atoms, lists, ropes ("industrial strength" strings), conditions. Multi-processing features include threads, monitors, signals and catch phrases. It was used to develop the Cedar integrated programming environment.
["A Description of the Cedar Language", Butler Lampson, Xerox PARC, CSL-83-15 (Dec 1983)].
["The Structure of Cedar", D. Swinehart et al, SIGPLAN Notices 20(7):230-244 (July 1985)].
(1995-01-26)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
Cite This Source
Easton
Bible Dictionary

Cedar definition


(Heb. e'rez, Gr. kedros, Lat. cedrus), a tree very frequently mentioned in Scripture. It was stately (Ezek. 31:3-5), long-branched (Ps. 80:10; 92:12; Ezek. 31:6-9), odoriferous (Cant. 4:11; Hos. 14:6), durable, and therefore much used for boards, pillars, and ceilings (1 Kings 6:9, 10; 7:2; Jer. 22:14), for masts (Ezek. 27:5), and for carved images (Isa. 44:14). It grew very abundantly in Palestine, and particularly on Lebanon, of which it was "the glory" (Isa. 35:2; 60:13). Hiram supplied Solomon with cedar trees from Lebanon for various purposes connected with the construction of the temple and the king's palace (2 Sam. 5:11; 7:2, 7; 1 Kings 5:6, 8,10; 6:9, 10, 15, 16, 18, 20; 7:2, 3, 7, 11, 12; 9:11, etc.). Cedars were used also in the building of the second temple under Zerubbabel (Ezra 3:7). Of the ancient cedars of Lebanon there remain now only some seven or eight. They are not standing together. But beside them there are found between three hundred and four hundred of younger growth. They stand in an amphitheatre fronting the west, about 6,400 feet above the level of the sea. The cedar is often figuratively alluded to in the sacred Scriptures. "The mighty conquerors of olden days, the despots of Assyria and the Pharaohs of Egypt, the proud and idolatrous monarchs of Judah, the Hebrew commonwealth itself, the war-like Ammonites of patriarchal times, and the moral majesty of the Messianic age, are all compared to the towering cedar, in its royal loftiness and supremacy (Isa. 2:13; Ezek. 17:3, 22, 23, 31:3-9; Amos 2:9; Zech. 11:1, 2; Job 40:17; Ps. 29:5; 80:10; 92:12, etc).", Groser's Scrip. Nat. Hist. (See BOX-TREE ØT0000636.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source
Example sentences
On a nearby tree a flock of cedar waxwings pecked at the shiny crab apples.
There is no fir tree so small it does not expect to become a cedar.
Cedar trees have begun making toxins to protect themselves from being eaten by
  deer now roaming in their formerly benign habitats.
The campers' happy shrieks echoed in the cedar trees.
Image for cedar
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;