census

[sen-suhs]
noun, plural censuses.
1.
an official enumeration of the population, with details as to age, sex, occupation, etc.
2.
(in ancient Rome) the registration of citizens and their property, for purposes of taxation.
verb (used with object)
3.
to take a census of (a country, city, etc.): The entire nation is censused every 10 years.

Origin:
1605–15; < Latin: a listing and property assessment of citizens, equivalent to cēns(ēre) to assess, register (citizens) in a census + -tus suffix of v. action; for -s- in place of -st- see censor

censual [sen-shoo-uhl] , adjective
precensus, noun

census, consensus (see usage note at consensus).
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
census (ˈsɛnsəs)
 
n , pl -suses
1.  an official periodic count of a population including such information as sex, age, occupation, etc
2.  any offical count: a traffic census
3.  (in ancient Rome) a registration of the population and a property evaluation for purposes of taxation
 
[C17: from Latin, from cēnsēre to assess]
 
'censual
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

census
1613, from L. census, originally pp. of censere "to assess" (see censor).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Census definition


There are five instances of a census of the Jewish people having been taken. (1.) In the fourth month after the Exodus, when the people were encamped at Sinai. The number of men from twenty years old and upward was then 603,550 (Ex. 38:26). (2.) Another census was made just before the entrance into Canaan, when the number was found to be 601,730, showing thus a small decrease (Num. 26:51). (3.) The next census was in the time of David, when the number, exclusive of the tribes of Levi and Benjamin, was found to be 1,300,000 (2 Sam. 24:9; 1 Chr. 21:5). (4.) Solomon made a census of the foreigners in the land, and found 153,600 able-bodied workmen (2 Chr. 2:17, 18). (5.) After the return from Exile the whole congregation of Israel was numbered, and found to amount to 42,360 (Ezra 2:64). A census was made by the Roman government in the time of our Lord (Luke 2:1). (See TAXING.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
Obviously there were limitations on what box they could check on the census
  form, for example.
And speaking of animals, they too need a census of their own.
Eukaryotic cells with internal structures had appeared, but multicellular
  creatures were scarcely a blip in the census.
He had a beautiful business plan with census data, market research, complicated
  models and strict customer acquisition budgets.
Synonyms
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