chaise

[sheyz]
noun
1.
a light, open carriage, usually with a hood, especially a one-horse, two-wheeled carriage for two persons; shay.
3.
a chaise longue, especially a light one used out of doors.
4.
Also called chaise d'or [sheyz dawr] . Numismatics.
a.
a gold coin of France, first issued in the early 14th century, which bears a figure of the king seated on a large throne.
b.
an Anglo-Gallic copy of this coin, issued by Edward III.

Origin:
1695–1705; < French, variant of chaire chair

chaise, chase.
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La Chaise

[la shez] .
noun
Père François d'Aix de [frahn-swa de duh] , 1624–1709, French Roman Catholic priest: confessor to Louis XIV.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
chaise (ʃeɪz)
 
n
1.  a light open horse-drawn carriage, esp one with two wheels designed for two passengers
2.  post chaise short for chaise longue
3.  a gold coin first issued in France in the 14th century, depicting the king seated on a throne
 
[C18: from French, variant of Old French chaierechair]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

chaise
1701, "pleasure carriage," from Fr., variant of chaire (see chair) due to 15c.-16c. Parisian accent habit of swapping of -r- and -s-, often satirized by Fr. writers. Chaise lounge (1800) is corruption of Fr. chaise longue "long chair," the second word confused in Eng. with lounge.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

chaise

(French: "chair"), originally a closed, two-wheeled, one-passenger, one-horse carriage of French origin, adapted from the sedan chair. The carrying poles, or shafts, were attached to the horse's harness in front and fixed to the axle in back. The body of the carriage was set in front of the axle with its bottom lower than the shafts. The chaise body's position between the shafts provided stability but made side doors impossible, so that the passenger had an awkward climb over (or else had to duck under) the shafts in order to enter the carriage by a front door that opened downward. At first, the passenger drove the horse from within; later, the chaise was managed by a driver riding the horse

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Even when lounging in a chaise, she has the animal attentiveness of a cougar stalking her prey.
The adjustable arms can be lowered to one of four positions for a chaise lounge effect or a single sleeper.
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