chaps

[chaps, shaps]
noun (used with a plural verb)
a pair of joined leather leggings, often widely flared, worn over trousers, especially by cowboys, as protection against burs, rope burns, etc., while on horseback.
Also called chaparajos, chaparejos.


Origin:
1810–20, Americanism; short for chaparajos

Dictionary.com Unabridged

chap

1 [chap]
verb (used with object), chapped, chapping.
1.
to crack, roughen, and redden (the skin): The windy, cold weather chapped her lips.
2.
to cause (the ground, wood, etc.) to split, crack, or open in clefts: The summer heat and drought chapped the riverbank.
verb (used without object), chapped, chapping.
3.
to become chapped.
noun
4.
a fissure or crack, especially in the skin.
5.
Scot. a knock; rap.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English chappen; cognate with Dutch kappen to cut; akin to chip1

unchapped, adjective

chap

2 [chap]
noun
1.
Informal. a fellow; man or boy.
2.
Chiefly Midland and Southern U.S. a baby or young child.
3.
British Dialect. a customer.

Origin:
1570–80; short for chapman

chap

3 [chop, chap]
noun
chop3.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English; perhaps special use of chap1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
chap1 (tʃæp)
 
vb , chaps, chapping, chapped
1.  (of the skin) to make or become raw and cracked, esp by exposure to cold
2.  (Scot) (of a clock) to strike (the hour)
3.  (Scot) to knock (at a door, window, etc)
 
n
4.  (usually plural) a cracked or sore patch on the skin caused by chapping
5.  (Scot) a knock
 
[C14: probably of Germanic origin; compare Middle Dutch, German kappen to chop off]

chap2 (tʃæp)
 
n
informal a man or boy; fellow
 
[C16 (in the sense: buyer): shortened from chapman]

chap3 (tʃɒp, tʃæp)
 
n
a less common word for chop

chaps (tʃæps, ʃæps)
 
pl n
chaparejos, Also called: chaparajos leather overalls without a seat, worn by cowboys
 
[C19: shortened from chaparejos]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

chap
1577, "customer," short for obsolete chapman (see cheap). Colloquial sense of "lad, fellow" is first attested 1716 (cf. slang tough customer).

chap
"to crack," early 15c., chappen, variant of choppen (see chop). The noun meaning "fissure in the skin" is from late 14c.

chaps
1844, Amer.Eng., short for chaparejos, from Mexican Sp. chaparreras, worn to protect from chaparro (see chaparral).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

chap definition


  1. tv.
    to anger or annoy someone. (See also chapped.) : That whole business really chapped me.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
CHAP
Community Health Accreditation Program
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
The wanderer finds remote ranches and cowboys in hats and chaps instead of
  crusty fish camps and shirtless fishermen in sandals.
Depends on what you got going on with those chaps, cowboy.
They are great, buoyant chaps who hunt and fish and drink beer out of cans.
The chaps he liked best, however, were the tough ones.
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