cherish

[cher-ish]
verb (used with object)
1.
to hold or treat as dear; feel love for: to cherish one's native land.
2.
to care for tenderly; nurture: to cherish a child.
3.
to cling fondly or inveterately to: to cherish a memory.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English cherisshen < Middle French cheriss- (long stem of cherir), equivalent to cher dear (< Latin cārus) + -iss -ish2; akin to charity

cherishable, adjective
cherisher, noun
cherishingly, adverb
overcherish, verb (used with object)
overcherished, adjective
uncherished, adjective
uncherishing, adjective
well-cherished, adjective


1, 2. Cherish, foster, harbor imply giving affection, care, or shelter to something. Cherish suggests regarding or treating something as an object of affection or as valuable: to cherish a friendship. Foster implies sustaining and nourishing something with care, especially in order to promote, increase, or strengthen it: to foster a hope; to foster enmity. Harbor suggests giving shelter to or entertaining something undesirable, especially evil thoughts or intentions: to harbor malice or a grudge. 2. nurse, nourish, sustain.


2. neglect. 3. relinquish.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
cherish (ˈtʃɛrɪʃ)
 
vb
1.  to show great tenderness for; treasure
2.  to cling fondly to (a hope, idea, etc); nurse: to cherish ambitions
 
[C14: from Old French cherir, from cher dear, from Latin cārus]
 
'cherishable
 
adj
 
'cherisher
 
n
 
'cherishingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cherish
c.1320, from O.Fr. chériss-, extended stem of chérir "to hold dear," from cher "dear," from L. carus (see whore).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Hers is the type of art you may cherish as a touchstone of your own private
  taste.
It underestimates the intelligence of readers, stifles dialogue and insults
  those who cherish the freedom to read and write.
It's especially shocking to see it coming from fellow scientists, who
  supposedly cherish logic and sound reason.
Cherish any chance you get to learn from the best, and then learn from them.
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