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[chesh-er, -eer] /ˈtʃɛʃ ər, -ɪər/
Formerly Chester. a county in NW England. 899 sq. mi. (2328 sq. km).
a town in central Connecticut.
Also called Cheshire cheese, Chester. a hard cheese, yellowish, orange, or white in color, made of cow's milk and similar to cheddar. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for Cheshire
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The century, that opened with war and bloodshed, closed in peace such as Cheshire had hardly ever before experienced.

    Cheshire Charles E. Kelsey
  • The grasshopper is banished to the garden and the Cheshire Cat smiles all over her face.

    Lotus Buds Amy Carmichael
  • Hard; shape like Austrian Nagelkassa and the size of Cheshire though sometimes smaller.

    The Complete Book of Cheese Robert Carlton Brown
  • We next reached Harecastle, in Cheshire, where we landed for lunch.

  • The old Cheshire, everywhere in evidence with its timber-and-plaster houses, distracts the mind from this new industrial Cheshire.

    From Gretna Green to Land's End Katharine Lee Bates
British Dictionary definitions for Cheshire


/ˈtʃɛʃə; ˈtʃɛʃɪə/
a former administrative county of NW England; administered since 2009 by the unitary authorities of Cheshire West and Chester, and Cheshire East: low-lying and undulating, bordering on the Pennines in the east; mainly agricultural: the geographic and ceremonial county includes Warrington and Halton, which became independent unitary authorities in 1998. Area 2077 sq km (802 sq miles) Ches


Group Captain (Geoffrey) Leonard. 1917–92, British philanthropist: awarded the Victoria Cross in World War II; founded the Leonard Cheshire Foundation Homes for the Disabled: married Sue, Baroness Ryder
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Cheshire

1086, Cestre Scire, from Chester + scir "district" (see shire). Cheshire cat and its proverbial grin are attested from 1770, but the signification is obscure.

I made a pun the other day, and palmed it upon Holcroft, who grinned like a Cheshire cat. (Why do cats grin in Cheshire?--Because it was once a county palatine, and the cats cannot help laughing whenever they think of it, though I see no great joke in it.) I said that Holcroft, on being asked who were the best dramatic writers of the day, replied, "HOOK AND I." Mr Hook is author of several pieces, Tekeli, &c. You know what hooks and eyes are, don't you? They are what little boys do up their breeches with. [Charles Lamb, letter to Thomas Manning, Feb. 26, 1808]

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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