chortle

[chawr-tl]
verb (used without object), chortled, chortling.
1.
to chuckle gleefully.
verb (used with object), chortled, chortling.
2.
to express with a gleeful chuckle: to chortle one's joy.
noun
3.
a gleeful chuckle.

Origin:
blend of chuckle and snort; coined by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking-Glass (1871)

chortler, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To chortle
Collins
World English Dictionary
chortle (ˈtʃɔːtəl)
 
vb
1.  (intr) to chuckle gleefully
 
n
2.  a gleeful chuckle
 
[C19: coined (1871) by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking-glass; probably a blend of chuckle + snort]
 
'chortler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

chortle
coined 1872 by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking Glass," probably from chuckle and snort.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
We're the animal that wants to laugh, wants to unlock itself through a chuckle and a chortle.
If you find a typo, allow yourself a brief chortle of superiority.
Bumping for an update, which contains both some chortle-worthy lines and some eyebrow-raising ones.
Linda had a sharp wit and an infectious laugh that started with a low chortle.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature