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Chronicles

[kron-i-kuh lz] /ˈkrɒn ɪ kəlz/
noun, (used with a singular verb)
1.
either of two books of the Old Testament, I Chronicles or II Chronicles.
Abbreviation: I Chron., II Chron.

chronicle

[kron-i-kuh l] /ˈkrɒn ɪ kəl/
noun
1.
a chronological record of events; a history.
verb (used with object), chronicled, chronicling.
2.
to record in or as in a chronicle.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English cronicle < Anglo-French, variant, with -le -ule, of Old French cronique < Medieval Latin cronica (feminine singular), Latin chronica (neuter plural) < Greek chroniká annals, chronology; see chronic
Related forms
chronicler, noun
unchronicled, adjective
Synonyms
2. recount, relate, narrate, report.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for Chronicles

Chronicles

/ˈkrɒnɪkəlz/
noun
1.
(functioning as sing) either of two historical books (I and II Chronicles) of the Old Testament

chronicle

/ˈkrɒnɪkəl/
noun
1.
a record or register of events in chronological order
verb
2.
(transitive) to record in or as if in a chronicle
Derived Forms
chronicler, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Anglo-French cronicle, via Latin chronica (pl), from Greek khronika annals, from khronikos relating to time; see chronic
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Chronicles

chronicle

n.

c.1300, cronicle, from Anglo-French cronicle, from Old French cronique "chronicle" (Modern French chronique), from Latin chronica (neuter plural mistaken for fem. singular), from Greek ta khronika (biblia) "the (books of) annals, chronology," neuter plural of khronikos "of time." Ending modified in Anglo-French, perhaps by influence of article. Old English had cranic "chronicle," cranicwritere "chronicler." The classical -h- was restored in English from 16c.

v.

c.1400, croniclen, from chronicle (n.). Related: Chronicled; chronicling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Chronicles in the Bible

the words of the days, (1 Kings 14:19; 1 Chr. 27:24), the daily or yearly records of the transactions of the kingdom; events recorded in the order of time.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Article for Chronicles

chronicle

a usually continuous historical account of events arranged in order of time without analysis or interpretation. Examples of such accounts date from Greek and Roman times, but the best-known chronicles were written or compiled in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. These were composed in prose or verse, and, in addition to providing valuable information about the period they covered, they were used as sources by William Shakespeare and other playwrights. Examples include the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia regum Britanniae (History of the Kings of Britain), Andrew of Wyntoun's Orygynale Cronykil, and Raphael Holinshed's Chronicles of England, Scotlande, and Irelande. The word is from the Middle English cronicle, which is thought to have been ultimately derived from the Greek chronos, "time."

Learn more about chronicle with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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