cinema

[sin-uh-muh]
noun
1.
Chiefly British, motion picture.
2.
the cinema, motion pictures collectively, as an art.
3.
Chiefly British. a motion-picture theater.

Origin:
1895–1900; short for cinematograph

cinematic [sin-uh-mat-ik] , adjective
cinematically, adverb
uncinematic, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
cinema (ˈsɪnɪmə)
 
n
1.  chiefly (Brit)
 a.  a place designed for the exhibition of films
 b.  (as modifier): a cinema seat
2.  the cinema
 a.  the art or business of making films
 b.  films collectively
 
[C19 (earlier spelling kinema): shortened from cinematograph]
 
cinematic
 
adj
 
cine'matically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cinema
1899, "a movie hall," from Fr. cinéma, shortened from cinématographe, coined 1890s by Lumiere brothers, who invented it, from Gk. kinema "movement," from kinein "to move" (see cite). Meaning "movies collectively, especially as an art form" first recorded 1918.
Cinéma vérité is 1963, from Fr.; Cinerama, proprietary name, is from 1951.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Sunshine's special effects, though, are quite amazing--it really feels hot in
  that cinematic sunlight.
More than that, it is highly suspenseful in a slick cinematic style.
The musical cinematic confection comes out in an ultimate collector's edition.
Nor are they without their cinematic debts and influences.
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