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clack

[klak] /klæk/
verb (used without object)
1.
to make a quick, sharp sound, or a succession of such sounds, as by striking or cracking:
The loom clacked busily under her expert hands.
2.
to talk rapidly and continually or with sharpness and abruptness; chatter.
3.
to cluck or cackle.
verb (used with object)
4.
to utter by clacking.
5.
to cause to clack:
He clacked the cup against the saucer.
noun
6.
a clacking sound.
7.
something that clacks, as a rattle.
8.
rapid, continual talk; chatter.
Origin
1200-1250
1200-50; Middle English clacken; imitative
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for clack
  • Another opens on to the hum of fans and the clack of keyboards from workrooms and offices.
  • In the translators' offices alone the computer keys clack on unabated.
  • The slow deliberate clack of half a mile of wagons follows.
  • She moved her chair until it struck mine with a dry, wooden clack.
  • Antlers clack, brown noses stick up out of the scrum.
  • The only sounds were the soft clack of keys, the typebars' satisfying snap, and the chime marking the end of a line.
  • The knife sharpener provides percussion-a steady click-clack of metal plates.
  • Around the bazaar, near the old fort that dominates the city, there was the clack of a shutter being drawn up.
British Dictionary definitions for clack

clack

/klæk/
verb
1.
to make or cause to make a sound like that of two pieces of wood hitting each other
2.
(intransitive) to jabber
3.
a less common word for cluck
noun
4.
a short sharp sound
5.
a person or thing that produces this sound
6.
chatter
7.
Also called clack valve. a simple nonreturn valve using either a hinged flap or a ball
Word Origin
C13: probably from Old Norse klaka to twitter, of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for clack
v.

mid-13c., not in Old English, from Old Norse klaka "to chatter," of echoic origin; cf. Dutch klakken "to clack, crack," Old High German kleken, French claquer "to clap, crack (see claque). Related: Clacked; clacking.

n.

mid-15c., from clack (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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