clamorous

[klam-er-uhs]
adjective
1.
full of, marked by, or of the nature of clamor.
2.
vigorous in demands or complaints.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English. See clamor1, -ous

clamorously, adverb
clamorousness, noun
nonclamorous, adjective
nonclamorously, adverb
unclamorous, adjective
unclamorously, adverb
unclamorousness, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
clamour or clamor (ˈklæmə)
 
n
1.  a loud persistent outcry, as from a large number of people
2.  a vehement expression of collective feeling or outrage: a clamour against higher prices
3.  a loud and persistent noise: the clamour of traffic
 
vb
4.  (intr; often foll by for or against) to make a loud noise or outcry; make a public demand: they clamoured for attention
5.  (tr) to move, influence, or force by outcry: the people clamoured him out of office
 
[C14: from Old French clamour, from Latin clāmor, from clāmāre to cry out]
 
clamor or clamor
 
n
 
vb
 
[C14: from Old French clamour, from Latin clāmor, from clāmāre to cry out]
 
'clamourer or clamor
 
n
 
'clamorer or clamor
 
n
 
'clamorous or clamor
 
adj
 
'clamorously or clamor
 
adv
 
'clamorousness or clamor
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
Worshiped for centuries by amorous couples coupling clamorously.
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