clamor

1 [klam-er]
noun
1.
a loud uproar, as from a crowd of people: the clamor of the crowd at the gates.
2.
a vehement expression of desire or dissatisfaction: the clamor of the proponents of the law.
3.
popular outcry: The senators could not ignore the clamor against higher taxation.
4.
any loud and continued noise: the clamor of traffic; the clamor of birds and animals in the zoo.
verb (used without object)
5.
to make a clamor; raise an outcry.
verb (used with object)
6.
to drive, force, influence, etc., by clamoring: The newspapers clamored him out of office.
7.
to utter noisily: They clamored their demands at the meeting.
Also, especially British, clamour.


Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English clamor (< Anglo-French) < Latin, equivalent to clām- (see claim) + -or -or1; Middle English clamour < Middle French < Latin clāmōr- (stem of clāmor)

clamorer, clamorist, noun


1. shouting. 2. vociferation. 4. See noise.


See -our.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
clamour or clamor (ˈklæmə)
 
n
1.  a loud persistent outcry, as from a large number of people
2.  a vehement expression of collective feeling or outrage: a clamour against higher prices
3.  a loud and persistent noise: the clamour of traffic
 
vb
4.  (intr; often foll by for or against) to make a loud noise or outcry; make a public demand: they clamoured for attention
5.  (tr) to move, influence, or force by outcry: the people clamoured him out of office
 
[C14: from Old French clamour, from Latin clāmor, from clāmāre to cry out]
 
clamor or clamor
 
n
 
vb
 
[C14: from Old French clamour, from Latin clāmor, from clāmāre to cry out]
 
'clamourer or clamor
 
n
 
'clamorer or clamor
 
n
 
'clamorous or clamor
 
adj
 
'clamorously or clamor
 
adv
 
'clamorousness or clamor
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

clamor
late 14c., from O.Fr. clamour, from L. clamor "a shout," from clamare "to cry out" (see claim). Related: Clamorous (1520s), clamorously (1530s).

clamour
British spelling of clamor (q.v.); for suffix, see -or.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Aghast, the newspapers of the world responded to this sensational scientific
  advance with a clamour of moral outrage.
But the figures will add to the clamour for shareholders to have more say.
The president said there had been a popular clamour for her to run and prodding
  from her own party.
Her accusers first tried to raise a public clamour for the president's
  resignation.
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