clausula

clausula

[klaw-zhuh-luh]
noun, plural clausulae [klaw-zhuh-lee] . Music.
an ornamented cadence especially in early Renaissance music.

Origin:
< Latin: a closing, conclusion, equivalent to claus(us) (past participle of claudere to close) + -ula -ule

clausular, adjective
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clausula

in Greek and Latin rhetoric, the rhythmic close to a sentence or clause, or a terminal cadence. The clausula is especially important in ancient and medieval Latin prose rhythm; most of the clausulae in Cicero's speeches, for example, follow a specific pattern and distinctly avoid certain types of rhythmic endings. The final words of a speech were an important element of its effectiveness. Thus, the quantity of syllables became the basis on which to establish a regular metrical sequence. Certain endings were regarded as strong and were preferred; others were avoided as weak

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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