clerihew

clerihew

[kler-uh-hyoo]
noun Prosody.
a light verse form, usually consisting of two couplets, with lines of uneven length and irregular meter, the first line usually containing the name of a well-known person.

Origin:
1925–30; named after E. Clerihew Bentley (1875–1956), English writer, its inventor

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Collins
World English Dictionary
clerihew (ˈklɛrɪˌhjuː)
 
n
a form of comic or satiric verse, consisting of two couplets of metrically irregular lines, containing the name of a well-known person
 
[C20: named after Edmund Clerihew Bentley, who invented it]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

clerihew
humorous verse form, 1928, from Eng. humorist Edmund Clerihew Bentley (1875-1956), who described it in a book published 1906 under the name E. Clerihew.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

clerihew

a light verse quatrain in lines usually of varying length, rhyming aabb, and usually dealing with a person named in the initial rhyme.

Learn more about clerihew with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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