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7 Essential Words of Fall

cloak

[klohk] /kloʊk/
noun
1.
a loose outer garment, as a cape or coat.
2.
something that covers or conceals; disguise; pretense:
He conducts his affairs under a cloak of secrecy.
verb (used with object)
3.
to cover with or as if with a cloak:
She arrived at the opera cloaked in green velvet.
4.
to hide; conceal:
The mission was cloaked in mystery.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English cloke (< Old French) < Medieval Latin cloca, variant of clocca bell-shaped cape, bell; see clock1
Related forms
cloakless, adjective
undercloak, noun
well-cloaked, adjective
Synonyms
2. cover, mask, veil.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for cloak
  • Go online and look for a cloak to use as a coat in the meantime.
  • Low-growing perennials cloak this rock garden with soft colors and textures.
  • Bitterly crosses the street to a single-story concrete building half hidden under a straggling cloak of ivy.
  • But scientists are still far from designing and manufacturing such a cloak.
  • In the cash world, anonymity can be a cloak for wrongdoing.
  • Scientists in general too often wear the cloak of so-called objectivity.
  • Target is leaning towards predatory lending, but is swaddling that practice in the cloak of charity.
  • But many governments, jealously guarding the cloak of statehood, lobbied to keep the commission weak.
  • Wearing a thin cloak of democracy does little to hide the cronyism and despotic nature that inflicts it.
  • She has long, wavy blond hair and is wearing a blue-gray dress and a heavy gold cloak.
British Dictionary definitions for cloak

cloak

/kləʊk/
noun
1.
a wraplike outer garment fastened at the throat and falling straight from the shoulders
2.
something that covers or conceals
verb (transitive)
3.
to cover with or as if with a cloak
4.
to hide or disguise
Word Origin
C13: from Old French cloque, from Medieval Latin clocca cloak, bell; referring to the bell-like shape
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cloak
n.

late 13c., "long, loose outer garment," from Old North French cloque (Old French cloche, cloke) "travelling cloak," from Medieval Latin clocca "travelers' cape," literally "a bell," so called from the garment's bell-like shape (the word is thus a doublet of clock (n.1)). An article of everyday wear in England through 16c., somewhat revived 19c. as a fashion garment. Cloak-and-dagger (adj.) attested from 1848, said to be ultimately translating French de cape et d'épée, suggestive of stealthy violence and intrigue.

Other "cloak and dagger pieces," as Bouterwek tells us the Spaniards call their intriguing comedies, might be tried advantageously in the night, .... ["Levana; or the Doctrine of Education," English translation, London, 1848]

v.

c.1500, from cloak (n.). Figuratively from 1540s. Related: Cloaked; cloaking.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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cloak in the Bible

an upper garment, "an exterior tunic, wide and long, reaching to the ankles, but without sleeves" (Isa. 59:17). The word so rendered is elsewhere rendered "robe" or "mantle." It was worn by the high priest under the ephod (Ex. 28:31), by kings and others of rank (1 Sam. 15:27; Job 1:20; 2:12), and by women (2 Sam. 13:18). The word translated "cloke", i.e., outer garment, in Matt. 5:40 is in its plural form used of garments in general (Matt. 17:2; 26:65). The cloak mentioned here and in Luke 6:29 was the Greek himation, Latin pallium, and consisted of a large square piece of wollen cloth fastened round the shoulders, like the abba of the Arabs. This could be taken by a creditor (Ex. 22:26,27), but the coat or tunic (Gr. chiton) mentioned in Matt. 5:40 could not. The cloak which Paul "left at Troas" (2 Tim. 4:13) was the Roman paenula, a thick upper garment used chiefly in travelling as a protection from the weather. Some, however, have supposed that what Paul meant was a travelling-bag. In the Syriac version the word used means a bookcase. (See Dress.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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11
13
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