coccidioidomycosis

coccidioidomycosis

[kok-sid-ee-oi-doh-mahy-koh-sis]
noun Pathology.
a disease caused by inhaling spores of Coccidioides fungi, characterized by fever, respiratory infection, and reddish bumps on the skin, common in hot, semiarid regions, especially in southwestern U. S. and Mexico.
Also called cocci, desert fever, San Joaquin Valley fever, valley fever.


Origin:
1935–40; < Neo-Latin Coccidioid(es) name of the genus (see coccidium, -oid) + -o- + mycosis

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Collins
World English Dictionary
coccidioidomycosis (kɒkˌsɪdɪˌɔɪdəʊmaɪˈkəʊsɪs)
 
n
a disease of the skin or viscera, esp the lungs, caused by infection with the fungus Coccidioides immitis
 
[C20: from New Latin Coccidioides + -o- + mycosis]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

coccidioidomycosis coc·cid·i·oi·do·my·co·sis (kŏk-sĭd'ē-oi'dō-mī-kō'sĭs)
n.
An infectious respiratory disease of humans and other animals caused by inhaling the fungus Coccidioides immitis; it is characterized by fever and various respiratory symptoms. Also called valley fever.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

coccidioidomycosis

an infectious disease caused by inhalation of spores of the fungus Coccidioides immitis. C. immitis can be found in the soil, and most infections occur during dry spells in semiarid regions of the southwestern United States, especially around the San Joaquin Valley, and in the Chaco region of Argentina; dust storms have caused outbreaks of the infection in humans.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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